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MASSACHUSETTS 
HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 




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YEARBOOK 



1949 



MASSACHUSETTS 
HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 





1949 






FLOWER SHOWS 

MASSACHUSETTS 

HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

IN HORTICULTURAL HALL 

JANUARY 20 AND 21 Camellia Show 

MARCH 13 TO 19 Spring Flower Show 

(Mechanics Building) 

MAY 2 AND 3 Daffodil Show 

MAY 1 1 AND 12 Tulip Show 

JUNE 16 AND 17 Peonies, Iris and Roses 

AUGUST 23 AND 24 Exhibition of the Products 

of Children's Gardens 

AUGUST 25 AND 26 Gladiolus Show 

OCTOBER 13, 14 AND 15 Harvest Show 

NOVEMBER 3 TO 6 Autumn Flower Show 

(DATES SUBJECT TO CHANGE) 



1949 



YEARBOOK 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS^^-- 

HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 



Annual Die ports for 
1948 

and a List of 'Boo/cs 
^dded to the Library 



FOREWORD 

The Commitfee on Lectures and Publications has the honor to present 
herewith the twenty-sixth number of the Society's YEAR BOOK, with 
which are combined the annual reports for the year 1 948, 

Boston, Mass. ERNEST HOFTYZER 

July 1, 1949 Chairman 



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■^J^h 




DR. R. A. VAN METER 

President, University of Massachusetts 
Elected a Trustee, May 2, 1 949 



J 



CONTENTS 

Board of Government 5 

Committees of the Society 7 

Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1 948 9 

Garden Committee Awards 20 

Special Medal Awards 23 

Books Added to the Library 

Between May 1, 1948 and May 1, 1949 26 

Helen Noyes Webster 28 

Report: Benevolent Fruit and Flower Mission 35 

ANNUAL MEETING 

The President's Address 38 

Report of the Secretary 41 

Report of Exhibitions Committee 44 

Report of the Committee on Prizes 45 

Report of Committee on Children's Gardens 46 

Report of the Library Committee 48 

Report of the Treasurer 50 

Result of the Balloting 53 

Necrology 54 

Honorary Members 56 

Bequests to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society Ill 

3 




Bachrach 



OLIVER WOLCOn 



Elected a Trustee, May 2, 1 949 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNMENT 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

President 
JOHN S. AMES 

Vice-Presidents 

AUBREY B, BUTLER 

DR. GEORGE O. CLARK 

Trustees 

*John S. Ames Seth L. Kelsey (1951) 

*Aubrey B. Butler Ray M. Koon (1950) 

George W. Butterworth (1952) George Lewis, Jr. (1952) 

*Stedman Buttrick Elmer D. Merrill (1950) 

George B. Cabot (1951) Mrs. William A. Parker (1951) 

*Dr. George O. Clark Harold S. Ross (1950) 
Mrs. John Gardner Coolidge (1952) R. A. Van Meter (1952) 

Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby (1950) Mrs. Roger S. Warner (1951) 
Ernest Hoftyzer (1950) *Edwin S. Webster 

Walter Hunnewell (1951) Oliver Wolcott (1952) 

Honorary Trustee 
Oakes Ames 

Treasurer 
STEDMAN BUTTRICK 

Assistant Treasurer 
GEORGE LEWIS, JR. 

Secretary 
ARNO H. NEHRLING 

* Members ex-officio. Dates given are those of expiration of terms. 

5 




The Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 



John S. Ames, president, awards this Society's highest honor to Alexander 
Irving Heimlich, Woburn, for most outstanding exhibit in 1948 



COMMITTEES OF THE SOCIETY 

For the Year Ending May 1, 1950 



AUBREY B. BUTLER 
STEDAAAN BUHRICK 



STEDMAN BUHRICK 



AUBREY B. BUTLER 
STEDA\AN BUHRICK 



GEORGE W. BUHERWORTH 



GEORGE W. BUHERWORTH 
RAY M. KOON 



ERNEST BOROWSKI 



MRS. S. V. R. CROSBY 
GEORGE LEWIS, JR. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 

JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 

EDWIN S. WEBSTER 
MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE 

RAY M. KOON, Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON EXHIBITIONS 
DR. ELMER D. MERRILL, Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PRIZES 

GEORGE B. CABOT, Chairman 
THOAAAS MILNE, Co-Chairman 

JAMES METHVEN 

COMMITTEE ON LIBRARY 

DR. ELMER D. MERRILL, Chairman 



DR. GEORGE O. CLARK 
EDWIN S. WEBSTER 



WALTER HUNNEWELL 



DR. GEORGE O. CLARK 
WALTER HUNNEWELL 



ERNEST HOFTYZER 



MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 
HAROLD D. STEVENSON 



WALTER HUNNEWELL 



MRS. SUSAN McKELVEY 
MRS. ROGER S. WARNER 



COMMITTEE ON LECTURES AND PUBLICATIONS 

ERNEST HOFTYZER, Chairman 



DR. R. A. VAN METER 



AUBREY B. BUTLER 
SETH L. KELSEY 



RAY M. KOON 



COMMITTEE ON SPECIAL MEDALS 

HAROLD S. ROSS, Chairman 



MRS. JOHN G. COOUDGE 
ALEXANDER I. HEIMLICH 



GEORGE W. BUHERWORTH 



COMMITTEE ON GARDENS 

SETH L. KELSEY, Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON BUILDING 
JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 



DR. R. A. VAN METER 
DR. ELMER D. MERRILL 



GEORGE LEWIS, JR. 
OLIVER WOLCOn 



STEDMAN BUHRICK 



COMAUrrEE ON CHILDREN'S GARDENS EXHIBITIONS 

MRS. ROGER S. WARNER, Chairman 



DANIEL W. O'BRIEN 



MRS. HENRY D. TUDOR 



ALBERT C. BURRAGE, JR. 
MRS. JOHN G. COOLIDGE 

GEORGE B. CABOT 
WALTER HUNNEWELL 



COMMfrrEE ON THE ALBERT C. BURRAGE GOLD VASE 

HAROLD S. ROSS, Chairman 

DR. ELMER D. MERRILL 
GEORGE B. CABOT 
NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

SETH L. KELSEY 
MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 
MRS. ROGER S. WARNER 




LORD ABERCONWAY, London, England 

President, Royal Horticultural Society 

awarded 

George Robert White Medal of Honor 

for eminent service in horticulture 

8 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1948 

The Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

Alexander Irving Heimlich, Woburn, for the most outstanding exhibit in 1948. 

George Robert White Medal of Honor 

Lord Aberconway, London, England, for eminent service in horticulture. 

Thomas Roland Medal 

Henry Kohankie, Painesville, Ohio, for skill in horticulture. 

Jackson Dawson Memorial Medal 

Harold B. Tukey, East Lansing, Michigan, for his work with apple understocks 
and the introduction of many new varieties of small fruits. 

Gold Medal of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

The Gardner Museum, The Fenway, Boston, for a model garden of high educa- 
tional value. 

Gold Medal of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

A. Kenneth Simpson, Pittsfield, for his outstanding work in developing the Berk- 
shire Garden Center. 

Gold Medal of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

George H. Palmer, Chestnut Hill, for his skill in producing and exhibiting plants 
in the shows of the Society over a long period of years. 

Silver Medal of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mr. and Mrs. Willard Hudson, Winchester, for the skillful development of the 
outdoor living-room type of garden. 

Silver Medal of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry G. Stoddard, Bass Rocks, Gloucester, for a wonderful 
transformation of bare rocks into a beautiful garden. 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society Scroll 

Dr. Hugh P. Baker, Winter Park, Florida, in recognition of his achievements in 
developing the State College into the University of Massachusetts. 

President's Cup 

Lexington Nurseries, Inc., Lexington, for the "Garden of Reverie" at the Spring 
Show. 

Gold Medal of the Horticultural Society of New York 

Alexander Irving Heimlich, Woburn, for a naturahstic garden at the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal Certificate of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 

Albert A. Hulley, Middleboro, for a Rose Garden at the Spring Show. 

The George Holliday Memorial Prize 

Peter Arnott, Chestnut Hill, for a group of orchid plants at the Spring Show. 

Beacon Hill Garden Club Cup 

Groton Garden Club, for a corner of a fruit garden at the Spring Show. 

9 




Grand Hall at 1949 New England Spring Flower Show 

A tropical scene representing a jungle near the headwaters of the Amazon River. 
Hosts of brilliant orchids were massed amid rare tropical trees and shrubs. The 
Society was awarded the Bulkley Medal of the Garden Club of America for 

this bold and original display 



10 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES— Conf/nuec/ 11 

Mrs. John S. Ames Cup 

The Junior League Garden Club for the horticultural excellence of a June Border 
at the Spring Show. 

The Charles H. Toffy Memorial Medal 

Alexander Irving Heimlich, Wobum, for the most meritorious exhibit at the 
Spring Show. 

The Anfoine Leufhy Gold Medal 

William Todd, North Uxbridge, for the best display of flowering and foliage plants 
at the Spring Show. 

Trophy of fhe Massachusefffs Departmenf of Agriculture 

Bay State Nurseries, Inc., North Abington, for a Dutch Garden at the Spring 
Show. 

Sarah Todd Bulkley Medal of the Garden Club of America 

Alexander Irving Heimlich, Woburn, for a naturalistic garden at the Spring Show. 

Book: John C. Wister*s "Woman's Home Companion Garden Book" 

John S, Ames, North Easton, for the camellia Grandiflora rosea, best bloom in 
the Show. 

Crystal Vases 

Harold S. Ross, Hingham, for the cottage tulip Mrs. John T. Scheepers, best 

bloom in the Show. 
Perry Seed Company, Boston, for the dafifodil Golden Harvest, best bloom in the 

Show. 

New England Gladiolus Society 29th Anniversary Prize 

An illuminated scroll awarded by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society to Mr. 
and Mrs. Lester G. Bruggemann, Hingham, for Champion Spike (Connecticut 
Yankee). 

Gold Medals 

Mrs. Thomas Barbour, for a display of vegetables. 

Bay State Nurseries, Inc., for a Dutch Garden at the Spring Show. 

Boston School of Flower Arrangement, Mrs. Arthur P. Teele, Director, for Winter 

arrangements for home and church. 
Mrs. E. D. Brandegee, for a group of chrysanthemumis. 
Breck's, for a display of daffodils. 
Breck's, for a display of tulips. 
Breck's, for tulip fields at the Spring Show. 

Fishelson, Florist, for a continental flower market at the Spring Show. 
The Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts (Mrs. Chester Cook and Mrs. 

Benjamin W. Currier, co-chairmen), for flower arrangements at the Spring 

Show. 
Garden-in-the- Woods (Will C. Curtis), for a rock garden featuring species tulips 

and other bulbs and plants at the Spring Show. 
Gardeners and Florists Club of Boston, for a display of tulips. 
Elmer Gove, Burlington, Vermont, for a display of gladiolus. 
Alexander Irving Heimlich, for a ledge garden at the Spring Show. 
Albert A. Hulley, for a rose garden at the Spring Show. 
Lexington Nurseries, Inc., for the "Garden of Reverie" at the Spring Show. 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society Women's Exhibitions Conmiittee (Mrs. 

James H. Perkins, 2nd and Miss Mary M. Binney, co-chairmen), for a terraced 

garden, seasonally planted at the Spring Show. 
Mrs. H. Alarik W. Myrin, Kimberton, Pennsylvania (at Philadelphia), for a group 

of chrysanthemums. 




Spring Flower Show, 1949 

A section of the jungle in Grand Hall, showing a few of the gorgeous orchids 
and palms, with a native's hut in the background 



12 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES — Continued 13 

New Eugland Carnation Growers Association, for a display of carnations at the 

Spring Show. 
Riverside Farm, Rhinecliff, New York, for an exhibit of Riverside anemones at the 

Spring Show. 
Don Roehrs, East Rutherford, New Jersey (at New York), for the best garden in 

the Show. 
Roses Incorporated, for displays of roses at the Spring Show. 
William T. Walke & Sons, Inc., for a group of amaryllis at the Spring Show. 
Edwin S. Webster, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 
Weston Nurseries, Inc., for an informal Spring corner garden at the Spring Show. 

Silver Medals 

Arnold Arboretum, for a collection of photographs of plants growing in the Arnold 
Arboretum at the Spring Show. 

Boston Mycological Club, for an exhibit of economically important fungi at the 
Spring Show. 

Boston School Gardens — Woburn, for the largest and best display of vegetables 
and flowers from a school garden. 

Mrs. J. D. Cameron Bradley, for a display of camellias. 

Breck's, for a display of miniature dahlias. 

Bristol County Agricultural School, Horticultural Club, for a display of cut flow- 
ers at the Spring Show. 

Cherry Hill Nurseries, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

Frost & Higgins Company, for a formal garden at the Spring Show. 

Thomas L. Galvin, for an exhibit of large-flowered dahlias. 

Edgar L. Kline, Lake Grove, Oregon, for a collection of lilies. 

Mt. Auburn Cemetery, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

New England Branch — American Begonia Society, for a display of begonias. 

New York and New England Apple Institute, Inc., for a bank of apples. 

Mrs. Robert Treat Paine, 2nd, for a group of chrysanthemums. 

Mrs. Robert Treat Paine, 2nd, for a group of cymbidiums at the Spring Show. 

Park Floral Company, Denver, Colorado, for carnation Glacier. 

S. Arthur Peterson, for carnation Pink Art. 

John Russell, for a display of daffodils. 

Miss Eleanora Sears, for a group of chrysanthemums. 

George L. Slate — New York Agricultural Experiment Station — for a collection 
of hybrid lily seedlings. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, for a group of nerines. 

Marinus Van Der Pol, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

H. Vermeulen, "Het Linden" (in Holland) for the most beautiful exhibit in the 
Show. 

Waltham Field Station, for a collection of unusual squash and apple varieties. 

Watson's Camellia Gardens, for a display of camellias. 

Edwin S. Webst«r, for a group of orchids. 

Bronze Medals 

Mrs. G. W. Anderson, for a display of vegetables. 

Woodbury ^M. Bartlett, for a chrysanthemum terrace. 

Bristol County Agricultural School, Horticultural Club, for an azalea garden at the 

Spring Show. 
Mrs. WUhelmina F. Greene, Winter Park, Florida, for an exhibit of water colors — 

Flowers of the Americas. 
Mr. Walter Hunnewell, for a collection of rhododendrons. 
Roman J. Irwin, Inc., New York City, for carnation Red Champion. 
Middlesex County Beekeepers Association for a beekeeping exhibit at the Spring 

Show. 
Oregon Bulb Farms, Sandy, Oregon, for a display of lilies. 
Patten & Company, for carnation Sylvia. 




Spring Flower Show, 1949 

The hyacinth garden, a section of the Spring and Autumn garden staged by 
Bay State Nurseries of Abington, Mass. 



14 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES— Conf/nuec/ 15 

George L. rflate and L. H. MacDaniels — New York Agricultural Experiment 

Station, for a miscellaneous collection of named varieties of lilies. 
Greorge H. Walker, for a collection of si>ecimen gourds. 
Yerex Bulb Farms, Newberg, Oregon, for aurelian hybrids. 

First Class CeHificates 

Anemone Riverside Betty, exhibited by Riverside Farm. 

Anemone Riverside Brilliant, exhibited by Riverside Farm. 

Anemone Riverside Carol, exhibited by Riverside Farm. 

Anemone Riverside Jean, exhibited by Riverside Farm. 

Anemone Riverside Majestic, exhibited by Riverside Farm. 

Anemone Riverside Royal, exhibited by Riverside Farm. 

Azalea Lambertus C. Bobbink, exhibited by Ernest Borowski. 

Carnation Pink Art, exhibit-ed by S. Arthur Peterson. 

Carnation Sylvia, exhibited by Patten & Company. 

Chrysanthemum Luther Adams Breck, exhibited by Breck's. 

Chrysanthemum Mrs. Thomas Dewey, exhibited by Cummings, the Florist. 

New English chrysanthemums, exhibited by Totty's. 

Lilium Enchantment, exhibited by Oregon Bulb Farms. 

Lilium Skyrocket, exhibited by Edgar L. Kline. 

Lilium speciosum, Lucie Wilson, exhibited by Frank Wilson. 

Awards of Merit 

Aurelian hybrid, variety Waltham, exhibited by Yerex Bulb Farms. 

Carnation Mrs. Virginia Irwin, exhibited by George P. Barr. 

Carnation Sidney Littlefield, exhibited by James Hudson Company. 

Carnation Sylvia, exhibited by Patten & Company. 

Celastrus scandens steffeki, exhibited by Edwin F. Steffek. 

C/hrysanthemum Fall Days, exhibited by P. I. Merry. 

Steuben Grape, exhibited by the New York Agricultural Ex})eiiment Station. 

Lilium auratum hybrids, exhibited by Boyce Thompson Institute. 

Lilium Cardinal, exhibited by Edgar L. Kline. 

Lilium Poak's Radiance, exhibited by Leslie Woodriff. 

Lilium speciosum punctatum, exhibited by Leslie Woodriff. 

Lilium Twinkle, exhibited by Leslie Woodriff. 

Peony Natanis, exhibited by Benjamin W. Guppy. 

Peony Paugus, exhibited by Benjamin W. Guppy. 

Peony Otash, exhibited by Benjamin W. Guppy. 

Dwarf pyrethrums, exhibited by Kenneth Houghton. 

Rose Pandora, exhibited by the Arnold Fisher Company. 

Thymus vulgaris. Border Gem, exhibited by Bay State Nurseries, Inc. 

Votes of Commendation 

Carnation Improved Virginia, exhibited by Charles Trombetti. 
Carnation Miller's Yellow, exhibited by Charles Trombetti. 
Carnation Tom Knipe, exhibited by Charles Trombetti. 
Carnation William Sims, exhibited by Charles Trombetti* 
Gladiolus Circe, exhibited by Konynenburg and Mark N. V. 
Gladiolus Ravel, exhibited by Konynenburg and Mark N. V. 
Iris Mary Grover, exhibited by The Merry's. 
Raspberry September, exhibited by Edwin F. Steffek. 
Peony Jacob Styer, exhibited by Styer's Nurseries. 

Cultural Certificates 

Peter Arnott, for a group of chrysanthemums. 

Bay State Nurseries, Inc., for hyacinths. 

Benson & Young, Inc., for a group of cyclamen. 

Breck's, for tulips. 

Brightridge Dairy Greenhouses, for a display of roses. 

Cummings, The Florist, for a group of chrysanthemums. 



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Spring Flower Show, 1949 



The herb garden of the Groton Garden Club — a section of the large feature 
staged by the Women's Exhibitions Committee of the Massachusetts Horticultural 

Society 



16 




Spring Flower Show, 1949 

The Forty Miners' Exhibit — a display by F. I. Carter & Sons of Tewksbury, showing 
a California desert with cacti and succulents 



17 



18 MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES— Confinuec/ 

James Eccles, for a display of camellias. 

Albert A. Hulley, for a collection of hybrid clematis. 

Albert A. Hulley, for a display of roses. 

Riverside Farm, for a display of anemones. 

William T. Walke & Sons, Inc., for a group of amaryllis. 

Weston Nurseries, Inc., for plants in an informal Spring comer garden. 

Vote of Thanks 

American Iris Society, for a collection of iris. 

Arnold Arboretum, for Arnold dwarf forsythia. 

Mrs. Georgiana Billingsley, for an arrangement of cultivated pussywillows. 

Butterworth's, for practical ways of using orchids in the home. 

Dr. George O. Clark, for Lilium regale. 

Mrs. Helen L. Cotter, for a June bouquet. 

Miss Margaret Csernak, for a sansevieria plant. 

Miss Patricia Csernak, for a sansevieria plant. 

J. F. Cummings, for Lucullus swiss chard. 

Essex Chapter Future Farmers of America, Horticulture Club, for a freedom 

vegetable garden. 
First Church of Christ Scientist, for single early tulip, Couleur Cardinal. 
First Church of Christ Scientist, for red triumph tulip, Denbola. 
First Church of Christ Scientist, for single early tulip, De Wet. 
First Church of Christ Scientist, for single early tulip, Golden Mascot. 
First Church of Christ Scientist, for single early tulip, Prosperine. 
First Church of Christ Scientist, for purple darwin tulip, Scotch Lassie. 
M. N. Follansbee, for gladorchids. 
Carl Hall, for new Holland varieties gladiolus. 
James Hudson Company, for carnation Harlequin. 
James Hudson Company, for new carnation varieties. 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hunnewell, for a display of camellias. 
Martin J. Kelley, for hardy primroses, var. Lisheen. 
Konynenburg and Mark N. V., for new European gladiolus. 
WUliam H. Lincoln School, Grade V, for begonia plants. 
Arthur Pautzsch, for Baptisia australis. 

Frederick J. Rea, for phlox including new dwarf variety — Ellingwood. 
Mrs. Gertrude Rein, for miniature gardens. 
Mrs. H. A. Sheehan, for a bowl of cut tuberous begonia flowers. 
Charles Trombetti, for an exhibit of carnations. 
Pasquale Vasaturo, for new small-flowered gladiolus. 
Miss Marjorie Walden, for gladiolus corsages. 
Edwin S. Webster, for dimorphotheca plants. 

Honorable Mention 

Joseph C. Andrews, for a display of gourds. 




Garden at Gardner Museum, The Fenway, Boston 

Awarded the Society's Gold Medal "for exceptional merit — a horticultural 
achievement of which Boston can be proud" 



19 



Garden Committee Awards 

The Board oj Trustees awarded the following medals on the recommendaiion 
of the Committee on Gardens. 

The Society's Gold Medal: 

To the Gardner Museum, the Fenway, Boston, for a model garden of excep- 
tional merit, being laid out with great taste in design, appropriateness of 
plant material comprising trees, shrubbery, perennials, annuals, grass bor- 
ders, ground covers in variety — all in excellent condition despite adverse 
city conditions. This may be well described as a demonstration garden of 
high educational value — a horticultural achievement of which Boston can 
be proud. 

The Society's Silver Medal: 

To Mr. & Mrs. Willard Hudson of 44 Winthrop Street, Winchester, for the 
skillful development of the outdoor living-room type of garden. This small 
garden at the corner of two streets is unique. Traffic is screened by a well 
placed alpine retaining wall which presents to passers-by a pleasing horticul- 
tural vista. Combining the lawn shrubbery in variety, perennials and annuals 
— well cared for — account for color from Spring to Fall. A tiny pool has 
been ingeniously arranged. Even the rear of a well planted out garage has 
been cleverly made to serve as an attractive picnic room. This manner of 
landscaping a small lot could be well commended for emulation. 

The Society's Silver Medal: 

To Mr. & Mrs. Harry G. Stoddard, Bass Rocks, Gloucester, for a wonder- 
ful transformation of bare rocks into a beautiful garden combining the best 
features of the boulder terrain as a background. This place might be viewed 
as really two gardens separated from each other by the house. The rock 
planting in front of the house is a riot of color with which the owner has been 
experimenting. In the rear of the house — toward the ocean side there is 
intensive development of a limited area with excellent landscape effect. A 
controlable watering system accounts for the splendid condition of grass, 
varied plant material, trees, roses, perennials, and an excellent collection of 
large flowered clematis, particularly notable being a group of the Huldine 
variety against a bamboo fencing. 

George 0. Clark, Chairman 



20 




Garden of Mr. and Mrs. Willard Hudson 
44 Winthrop Street, Winchester 

Awarded Society's Silver Medal for "the skillful development of the outdoor 

living-room type of garden" 



21 




Garden of Mr. and Mrs. Harry G. Stoddard 
Bass Rocks, Gloucester 

Awarded the Society's Silver Medal for "a wonderful transformation of bare 

rocks into a beautiful garden" 



22 



SPECIAL MEDAL AWARDS 

The Board of Trustees have awarded the following medals, on the recommenda- 
tion of the Special Medals Committee, Mr. Harold S. Ross, chairman. 

The GEORGE ROBERT WHITE MEDAL OF HONOR for service to 
horticulture: to Lord Aberconway, the president of the Royal Horticultural 
Society, London, England. Lord Aberconway is probably the outstanding- 
figure of his day in horticulture in Great Britain. His career, long and distin- 
guished in many fields, has been particularly illustrious in matters concerning 
gardening and horticulture. This was true in the years before World War II, 
during the very difficult days of the War, when the production of food from 
the soil was of vital importance, and, recently, during the scarcely less diffi- 
cult days of reconstruction. Lord Aberconway has always taken a keen in- 
terest in both gardening and horticulture in the United States and has been 
a guest of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society on several occasions. 




MR. HENRY KOHANKIE 



The THOMAS ROLAND 
MEDAL for skill in horticul- 
ture: to Mr. Henry Kohankie of 
Painesville, Ohio. Mr. Kohankie 
operates a very large nursery and 
supplies the nurserymen of the 
country with plant material not 
only in large amount but of high 
quality and of unusual varieties 
in addition to standard species 
and varieties. He enjoys an 
enviable reputation for his con- 
tributions to the development 
of professional horticulture with- 
in his field of commercial pro- 
duction for the trade. 



23 



24 



SPECIAL MEDAL AWARDS 



The JACKSON DAWSON 
MEDAL for skill in hybridiza- 
tion and propagation of hardy, 
woody plants: to Dr. H. B. 
Tukey. Presently head of the 
Department of Horticulture at 
Michigan State College, the 
Doctor was formerly a member 
of the staff of the New York 
State Agricultural Experiment 
Station and of the faculty of 
Cornell University. Through the 
years, he has made many con- 
tributions to horticulture in his 
specialized field, being particu- 
larly successful in his distm- 
guished work with apple under- 
stocks and also for his produc- 
tion of many new varieties of 
small fruits. 




DR. H. B. TUKEY 



The Society's GOLD MEDAL : 
to Mr. George Palmer for his 
skill and success in the growing 
of plants and also for his ac- 
complishments over many years 
in exhibiting plants at the vari- 
ous shows of the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society. Born and 
trained in Great Britain, he has 
the characteristic,thorough train- 
ing which can only be obtained 
through the old-fashioned ap- 
prentice system. An expert w^ho 
can grow any type of plant 
material, he is particularly out- 
standing for his success with 
standard-t}"pe plants such as heli- 
otropes, fuchsias, roses and gera- 
niums. Mr. Palmer has exhibited 
at more shows of this Society 
than any other single person. 




MR. GEORGE PALMER 



SPECIAL MEDAL AWARDS 



25 



The Society's GOLD MEDAL : 
to j\Ir. A. Kenneth Simpson, Di- 
rector of the Berkshire Garden 
Center at Stockbridge. During 
his years of service to this cele- 
brated gardening establishment 
in western Massachusetts, Mr. 
Simpson has displayed both 
executive skill in the manage- 
ment of the enterprise, and 
horticultural ability in the de- 
velopment of the many gardens 
which comprise the Center. 
Gardening is comparatively dif- 
ficult in the Berkshire Hills and 
yet the gardens of the County 
are famous for their beauty and 
diversity of plant material. Much 
of the present day's success in 
this development of gardening is 
due to the example and to the influence of the Berkshire Garden Center and 
to Mr. Simpson. 




KENNETH SIMPSON 




DR. HUGH P. BAKER 



The Society's SCROLL: to 
Dr. Hugh P. Baker, presently of 
Winter Park, Florida, and until 
recently, president of Massachu- 
setts State College — the insti- 
tution which has lately become 
the University of Massachusetts. 
It was due to Dr. Baker in large 
measure that the transformation 
of the University from an agri- 
cultural college to a modern State 
University was accomplished. 
This achievement is of such cal- 
ibre that it overshadows his con- 
tributions to horticulture, which 
were both numerous and valu- 
able over many years. Dr. Ba- 
ker's work has included: time 
with the U. S. Forest Service; 
professor of forestry, Iowa State 
College; dean, N. Y. State Col- 
lege of Forestry, executive secre- 
tary American Pulp and Paper 
Assoc; and manager, trade as- 
sociation department, U. S. 
Chamber of Commerce. During 
World War I he served as a ma- 
jor in the United States Army. 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

tAoy 1, 1948 - May 7, 1949 

HORTICULTURE 
General 

Better liomes and gardens. Gardening guide. 1949 

Fawcett, G. S. Chemical testing of plant nutrient solutions; 2d ed. 1947 

Free, M. Complete guide to gardening; 2d ed. 1948 

Gough, K. Garden book for Malaya. 1928 

Gunnison, 0. M. Learning to garden. 1948 

Hastings, L. and D. Southern garden book. 1948 

Hellyer, A. G. L. Your new garden; 2d ed. 1948 

Larkin, V. V. Winter victory gardens: grow vegetables, flowers and berries 

indoors all winter (by chemical culture) 1943 
Leonard, M. O all ye green things. 1947 
Macmillan, H. F. Tropical planting and gardening, with special reference 

to Ceylon; 5th ed. 1943 
Taylor, N., ed. Encyclopedia of gardening; 2d ed. 194S 
Young, A. W. J. Design for a school garden. 1948 

Propagation 

Garner, R. J. Grafter's handbook. 1947 

Sheat, W. G. Propagation of trees, shrubs and conifers. 1948 

Townsend, B. The complete seedsman . . . raising and cultivating every 

sort of seed belonging to a kitchen and flower garden. 1726 
Whyte, R. 0. and Murneek, A. E. Vernalization and photoperiodism, a 

symposium. 1946 

Pruning 

Catchpole, N. Simple pruning; 3d ed. 1946 

Hardij, J. A. Handboek voor boomweekers en tuinlieden. 1856 

Lorette, L. The Lorette system of pruning; trans, by W. R. Dykes; 2d ed. 

rev. by F. J. Chittenden. 1948 
Wittrock, G. L. The pruning book, fruit trees and ornamentals. 1948 

AUXILIARY SCIENCES 
Soils 

Andrews, W. B. The response of crops and soils to fertilizers and manures; 

3d ed. 1947 
Beaumont, A. B. Garden soils, their use and conservation. 1948 
Bruce, M. E. From vegetable waste to fertile soil, quick return compost. 

1947 
Gustafson, A. F. Using and managmg soils. 1948 
Hopkins, D. P. Chemicals, humus and the soil. 1948 
Howard, L. The earth's green carpet. 1947 
Kelley, W. P. Cation exchange in soils. 1948 
Pfeiffer, E. The earth's face and human destiny. 1947 
Rodale, J. I. Stone mulching in the garden. 1949 
Whitehead, S. B. Gardener's earth. 1945 
Worthen, E. L. Farm soils; 4th ed. 1948 

26 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 17 

Control of Diseases, Insects, Weeds 

Craig, J. J. 2,4-D weed control. 1948 

Dodge, B. 0. and Rickett, H. W. Diseases and pests of ornamental plants; 

rev. ed. 1948 
Frear, D. E. H. Catalogue of insecticides and fungicides. 1947. 2 vols. 
Frear, D. E. H. Chemistry of insecticides, fungicides, and herbicides; 2d 

ed. 1948 
Ong, E. R. de. Chemistry and uses of insecticides. 1948 

ORNAMENTAL PLANTS 

General 

Aiken, G. D. Pioneering with wild flowers; new ed. 194f3 

Chabot, E. Greenhouse gardening for everyone. 1946 

Correvon, A. Rocailles fleuris: les plantes des montagnes dans les jardins. 

1947 
Dix, J. F. Ch. and Roozen, W. Flowers in colour; English ed. rev. and with 

intro. by W. E. Shewell-Cooper. 1948 
Gillespie, N. Pacific coast gardening guide. 1949 
Hastings, L. and D. Southern garden book. 1948 
Hoehne, F. C. Arborizagao urbana. 1944 
Hottes, A. C. The book of annuals; 5th ed. rev. 1948 
Hottes, A. C. The book of perennials; 6th ed. 1942 
Hottes, A. C. Climbers and ground covers. 1947 
Keene, R. W. B. Over the garden fence. 1948 

Laurie, A. and Kiplinger, D. C. Commercial flower forcing; 5th ed. 1949 
Ohio ass'n of garden clubs. Ciarden record. 1948 
Pellett, F. C. Success with wild flowers. 1948 

Pirone, P. P. Maintenance of shade and ornamental trees; 2d ed. 1948 
Preston, I. Herbaceous perennials for Canadian gardens. 1946 
Seymour, E. L. D., ed. Favorite flowers in color. 1949 
Taylor, G. M. Old fashioned flowers. 1947 
Wister, .1. C. Bulbs for home gardens; 2d ed. 1948 

Monographs 

AUwood, M. C. Carnations and all dianthus; 3d ed. 1947 

American delphinium society. The delphinium. 1948 

American iris society. The iris, an ideal hardy perennial. 1947 

Baird, B. M. Roses for southern gardens. 1949 

Blasdale, W. C. Cultivated species of primula. 1948 

Boyle, L. M. My observations on growing cymbidiurn orchids out of doors. 

1947 
Brown, W. A. Tuberous begonias. 1948 
Briscoe, T. W. Orchids for amateurs; 3d ed. 1946 
Corsar, K. C. Primulas in the garden. 1948 
Foote, H. Mrs. Foote's rose book. 1948 
Higgins, V. The study of cacti; 2d ed. rev. 1946 
Ingram, C. Ornamental cherries. 1948 
Jacobsen, H. Succulent plants; rev. ed. 1947 
Lake, A. The past and the future of the Croft Easter lily. 1947 
Luedy, A. E. and M. V. The Christmas rose. 1948 
McCully, K. F. Commercial carnation growing. 1949 
Macfie, D. T, Lilies for the garden and greenhouse; 2d ed, 1947 



Helen Noyes Webster 

Mrs. HoUis Webster, to whom death came March 21, 1949 hati 
beeti an active member of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society for 
18 years. Like her late husband, she was devoted to botayiy and garden- 
ing, and with intense loyalty to this Society, she made it the medium 
through which to give other gardeners the benefit of knowledge gained 
through long years of work and study. The extent of this knowledge was 
amazing, especially in view of the fact that she had a large family and 
a multitude of household duties. She was active in garden club work 
and was among the founders of the American Herb Society, another 
organization dear to her heart. So woman was ever more generous 
with her time and energy than Mrs. Webster. She was constantly at the 
service of others, atid her memory will be revered by the many hundreds 
of persons with whom she came in contact throughout a long and useful 
life. 

The following verses were written in tribute to her. 



upRixG and the first snowdrop 

And a thousand cotyledons 

Bursting through the leaf mould 

Toward the life-giving sunshine. 

^laple's red bloom, first nectar 

For the wakening bee 

Life everywhere, as various as 

Abundant ; all loved by her and all 

Familiar as family faces at the table. 

A song in her heart for every leaf-bud and bloom. 

The wheelbarrow heavy with compost, 

The spade and the fork and knees to the ground 

In hours of fond transplanting 

The cleaning out of the hive 

And friendly touch of crawling bees 

Budding thyme and rosemary 

And the warm hallo to visitors who 

Come to learn and go away inspired. 

Bloom of apples, apricots, plums 

Flaming azalea, cool rhododendron, 

Lettuce, raspberries, fragrant straws. 

Full Summer hours of tilling in the sun, 



'^'S>&-^^m-3'^^'^^^'3^'^>3^^^&^^'^'SS^'^^^ 



'^&'^^^^'^^S^^^3'^^^^^^^^S'^^^^&^^^^^^ 



And joyful labor through the morning showers, 

Partner with Ceres, mother of the fecund soil, 

And after sundown hours of evening 

By a lighted lamp, with avid eyes, 

Busy pen, finding and recording 

Ancient herbal history, cures for old ills 

And quaint folk-lore of the garden. 

Then busy time of harvest always fully 

Shared with neighbors, day by day. 

And after this October and the Pilgrimage 

Alone to Georgetown to retrace 

Long days of golden memory 

When with him the family was in 

Its noontide and its full meridian; 

When children laughed in the water at play, 

And there was a never-ceasing din, 

But a din echoing the music of ineffable 

Happiness and trust and affection. 

And after the lonely pilgrimage 

The return, the careful covering 

of exhausted plants, to rest till Spring; 

The duties of the village church. 

The parent-teacher and the Scouts: 

The busy kitchen where hospitality 

Was like that of Baucis whose pitcher 

Never failed to pour forth for all who came, 

Abundantly with unaffected cheer. 

Now the wreaths for Christmastide ; 

Dining room piled high with boughs 

And cones and hollyberries. 

Wreaths and more wreaths taking shape. 

Spring, Summer, Autumn. 

And the crackling hearth fires 

Of long Winter evenings, — And now — 

At last once more the 1st sweet day of Springtime. 

A tender snowdrop pushes up 

Through melting snows, and on that day 

The impulse of eternal Spring touches 

Her soul to rise expanding flowerlike 

Into a new, untroubled flood 

Of never ending sunshine. 



5?^:^;^t:^aS'.?Sf^a^a?^a^^;a?^sa^^;^->5'^ 



30 BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

McFarland, J. H. Modern roses III. 1947 

Meulenaere, 0. de. Supplement h la liste descriptive des chrysanthenies 

d'hiver. 1894r-1898. 
North American lily society. Lily yearbook. 1948 
Odom, M. M. Handbook for African violet growers. 1948 
Oregon camellia society. Camellias illustrated. 1948 
Pyle, R. How to grow roses; 22d ed. 1948 

Ranson, E. R. Michaelmas daisies and other garden asters. 1948 
Royal horticultural society. A classified list of tulip names; new ed. 1948 
Royal horticultural society. Lily year book. 1948 
Ware, R. B. Success with lilies in the home garden. 1948 
Watkins, J. V. A B C of orchid growing. 1948 

VEGETABLES, HERBS, FRUITS 

Condit, I. J. The fig. 1949 

Lawson, W. The country housewife's garden. 1617. reprinted 1948 

Nouvelle pomologie romande illustree; 2e ed. 1944 

Rettew, G. R. Manual of mushroom culture; 4th ed. 1948 

Shoemaker, J. S. Small fruit culture; 2d ed. 1948 

Southwick, L. Dwarf fruit trees. 1948 

AGRICULTURE 

Country Life 

Beard, W. P. Starting to farm. 1948 

Bromfield, L. Malabar Farm. 1948 

Cox, J. F. and Jackson, L. E. Crop management and soil conservation; 2d 

ed. 1948 
Cook, G. C. Handbook on teaching vocational agriculture; 5th ed. 1947 
Deyoe, G. P. Living on a little land. 1948 
Hannah, H. W. Law on the farm. 1948 
Hutcheson, T. B. The production of field crops; 3d ed. 1948 
Moral, H. Buying country property. 1947 

McMillen, W. New riches from the soil: the progress of chemurgy. 1946 
Teller, W. M. The farm primer: a manual for the beginner and part-time 

farmer. 1948 
Turner, A. W. Machines for the farm, ranch and plantation. 1948 

Conservation 

Gustafson, A. F. Conservation in the United States; 3d ed. 1949 
Osbom, F. Our plundered planet. 1948 
Rodale, J. I. The healthy Hunzas. 1948 
Vogt, W. Road to survival. 1948 

Bees 

Demuth, G. S. Five hundred answers to bee questions. 1947 
Howes, F. N. Plants and beekeeping. 1945 
Morse, J. Following the bee line. 1941 

FORESTRY 

Baker, R. St.B. Green glory: the story of the forests of the world. 1948 
Koroleff, A. and Fitzwater, J. A. Managing small woodlands. 1947 
Toumey, J. W. and Korstian, C. F. Foundations of silviculture upon an eco- 
logical basis; 2d ed. 1947 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 31 

NATURAL HISTORY 

(V)mstock, A. 1>. Handbook of uatiire study; 24th ed. \S}3^> 

.lohuson, \. Heaven's tablelaii<l (the great plahis) 1947 

McCUntock, M., ed. Th(» (lre3^stone nature lover's treasury. 1948 

Teale, E. W. Days without time. 1948 

Hagen, V. W. von, ed. The green world of the naturalists: five centui'ies of 

natural history in South America. 1948 
Swain, R. B. Insect guide. 1948 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Clarke, H. F. The English landscape garden. 1948 

Colvin, B. Land and landscape. 1948 

Connecticut College. A plant handbook. 1940 

Curtis, C. H. and Hay, R. New plants of the year. 1948 

Digard, J. Les jardins de la Granja et leurs sculptures d^eoratives. 1934 

La' Gazette illustree des Amateurs de Jardins, annees 1940-1947 

Hall, G. H. Garden plans and designs. 1947 

Johnson, A. T. Rhododendrons, azaleas, magnolias, camellias and orna- 
mental cherries. 1948 

Popular mechanics magazine. Popular mechanics garden book: outdoor 
furniture (etc.) 1949 

Rohde, E. S. The scented garden; 2d ed. revised and enlarged. 1948 

Walling, V]. Gardens in Australia. 1940 

BOTANY 

General 

Andrews, H. N. Ancient plants and the world they lived in. 1947 

Asch, J. The story of plants. 1948 

Cain, S. A. Foundations of plant geography. 1944 

Hamblin, S. F. Identifying plants without a key. 1914 

Jessen, K. F. W. Botanik der Gegenwart und Vorzeit, in culturhistorischer 

Entwicklung. 1947 
Nelson, A. Principles of agricultural botany. 1940 
Ridley, H. N. Dispersal of plants throughout the world. 1930 
Steinmetz, E. F. Codex vegetabilis . . . botanical drugs and spices, trade 

dictionary in five languages. 1947 
Steinmetz, E. F. Vocabularium botanicum . . . plant terminology ... in 

six languages. 1947 

Anatomy, Physiology, etc. 

Combes, R. La forme des vegetaux et le milieu. 1940 

Crane, M. B. and Lawrence, W. J. C. Genetics of garden plants; 3d ed. 1947 

McDougall, W. B. Plant ecology; 4th ed. revised. 1949 

Neilson-Jones, W. The growing plant. 1948 

Parker, B. M. Plant factories. 1944 

Whyte, R. 0. Crop production and envii'onment. 1947 

Economic Plants 

Curtin, L. S. M. Healing herbs of the upper Rio Grande. 1947 
Dupuy, W. A. Our plant friends and foes; 2d ed. 1948 
Hall, A. D. Our daily bread. 1938 
Howes, F. N. Nuts, their production and everyday uses. 1948 



32 BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Kloppeiiburg-\'ersteegh, J. Wenken en raadge^^ngen betreffende het gebruik 

van Indische planten, vruchten, enz; 4de druk. 1934, 2 vols. 
Level, Mi-s. C. F. Herbal delights; 2d rev. ed. 1947 

Monographs 

Ames, O. Orchids in retrospect: a collection of essavs on the orchidaceae. 

194S 
Babcock, E. B. The genus crepis. 1947. 2 vols. 
Canms, A. I^es chataigniers. 1929. 2 vols. 
Camus, A. Us chenes. 1934-1939. 2 vols. 
Camus, E. G. Les bambuses. 1913. 2 vols. 

Chnton-Baker, H. W. Illustrations of conifers. 1909-1913. 3 vols. 
Hume, H. H. Azaleas, their kinds and culture. 1948 
Shirley, J. C. The redwoods of coast and Sierra; 4th ed. 1947 
Stelm, H. Svampbok (med tillhorande svampkarta) 1942 

Floras— U. S. 

Clements, E. S. Flowere of prairie and woodland. 1947 

Collingwood, G. H. Knowing your trees; 3d ed. 1948 

Doubleday, X. Blanchan. Wild flowers worth knowing. 1923 

Harlow, W. M. T\\ig key to the deciduous plants of eastern North America; 

4th ed. and Fioiit key to northeastern trees. 1946 
Hausman, E. H. Beghiner's guide to wild flowers. 1948 
Ixiunsberry, A. Wild flower book for young people. 1906 
Mathews, F. S. Book of wild flowers for young people. 
Ogden, E. C. Check-list of the vascular plants of ^Iaine. 1948 
Preston, R. J. Jr. North American trees. 1948 
Preston, R. J. Jr. Rock}^ Mountain trees; 2d ed. 1947 
Reeves, R. G. and Bain, D. C. Flora of south central Texas; rev. ed. 1947 
Rice, M. A. Trees and shrubs of Nantucket. 1946 
Stevens, W. C. Kansas wild flowers. 1948 
Traill, C. P. Canadian wild flowers. 1869 
^'an Rensselaer, M. Trees of Santa Barbara; rev. and enlarged ed. 1948 

Floras — Other Countries 

Marret, L. Les fleurs de la Cote d'Azur. 1926 

Ridlev, H. N. Flora of the Malay Peninsula, with illus. bv J. Hutchinson. 

1922-1925. 5 vols. 
Barrett, C. An Australian wild flower book. 1947 

ESSAYS AND POETRY 

Armitage, E. Flower and leaf. 1946 

Colej', H. M. The romance of garden flowers. 1948 

Cresswell, R. A., comp. The spirit of the trees (poetrj-) 1947 

Flower, N. Through my garden gate. 1945 

Flower facts and fancies. 1948 

Goethe, C. M. Geogardening. 1948 

Grover, E. 0., ed. Nature lover's knapsack, an anthology of nature poetry; 

revised, 2d ed. 1947 
Hickernell, M. R. and Brewer, E. W. Adam's herbs (poetry) 1947 
Jacobs, H. We chose the country. 1948 

Sherman, H. M. Call of the land: a novel of 4-H club work. 1948 
Simmonds, A. A horticultural who was who. 1948 
Smith, P. H. Perennial harvest. 1948 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 33 

Thoreau, H. D. \\'al(len: ed. and illus. l)y E. W. Teale. 1910 
Young, A. A prospect of flowers: a book about wild flowers. 1945 

PLANTS IN ART 
General 

Fiatelle, Inc. The story of color. 1945 

(lathorne-Hardy, R. Garden flowers from plates by Jane Loudon. 194S 

Flower Arrangement 

Biddle, D. and Blom, D. Table setting for everyone (with (•h:ij)ters on 

flowers for the table) 1949 
Hannay, F. J. Outlines of period flower arrangement. 194S 
Peterson, C. E. Flower arrangements. 194S 
Rogers, M. Flower arrangement a hobby for all. 194.S 
Starker, C. Western flower arrangement. 1947 
Thomj)son, M. Cut flowers, cultivation and arrangement in the liouse. 1947 

BIOGRAPHY 

McFarland, J. H. Memoirs of a rose man: tales from Breeze Hill. 1949 
Pinchot, G. Breaking new ground. 1947 

Raven, C. E. l-^nglish naturalists from Neckham to Riiy: a study of the 
making of the modern world. 1947 

TRAVEL • PLANT HUNTING 

Bates, X. B. East of the Andes and west of nowhere: a naturalist's wife in 

Colombia. 1947 
Douglas, M. 8. The Everglades, river of grass. 1947 
Halle, L. J. Jr. Spring in Washington. 1947 
Mexico. Archivo general de la nacion. The royal botanical expedition to 

New Spain 1788-1820; trans, and collated by H. W. Rickett. 1947 
Morrow, J. A scientist with Perry in Japan; ed. by A. B. Cole. 1947 
Peattie, R., ed. The Berkshires, the purple hills. 1948 
Rock, J. The ancient Na-Khi kingdom. 1947. 2 vols. 
Wait, L. H. Fairchild tropical garden. 1948 

CHILDREN'S BOOKS 

Dupuy, W. A. Our plant friends and foes; 2d ed. 1948 
I^unsberry, A. Wild flower book for young people. 1906 
Mathews, F. S. Book of wild flowers for young people. 
Parker, B. M, Plant factories. 1944 
Petersham, M. and M. The story book of corn. 1948 
Petersham, M. and M. The story book of cotton. 1948 
Petersham, M. and M. The story book of rice. 1948 
Petersham, M. and M. The story book of sugar. 1948 
Petersham, M. and M. The story book of wheat. 1948 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society acknowledges with thanks gifts to 
the Library from the following donors : 
AscH, J. 

The story of plants, by Jolin Ascli. 
Barney, Mrs. Edward ^L, Estate 

A collection of note books of poems and clippings on garden subjects 
Burrage, Alice H. (Mrs. A. C. Burrage) Estate 

A large collection of books on gardening, and of flower prints 



34 BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Cleverley, Mrs. Harry S. 

Photographs of gardens from th^e collection of Mrs. Jay Clark Jr. 
Craig, Kenneth 

Bailey. Cyciopetlia of American agriculture. 

Folger and Thompson. Commercial apple industry of North America. 

Hawley and Hawes. Manual of forestry for the northeastern United 
States. 

Hesler and Whetzel. Manual of fruit diseases. 

Hottes. Practical plant propagation. 

Slingerland and Crosby. Manual of fruit insects. 

Tukey. The pear and its culture. 

Van Meter. Bush fruit production. 

Weathers. Commercial gardening. 
Crosby, Mrs. S. V. R. 

La Gazette illustree des Amateurs de Jardins, ann^es 1940-1947. 
Dennis, Walter W. 

The child's botany; 5th edition. 1832. 
Farrington, E. I. 

Van Rensselaer, M. Trees of Santa Barbara; 2d ed., rev. and enlarged. 
Harvard University. Botanical Museum 

Ames, 0. Orchids in retrospect: a collection of essays. 
Herb Society of America. 

Connecticut College. Plant handbook, 
HiGGiNS, F. Hal 

Photostats of biographical notices on James L. F. Warren. 
Krauss, Herman 

Old farmer's almanac 1862, 1869 
McCuLLY, Kenneth F. 

McCuUy, K. F. Commercial carnation growing. 
McKelvey, Mrs. S. D. 

Hamblin, S. F. Identifying plants without a key. 
Nehrling, a. H. 

Morse, J. Following the bee line. 
Otis, Mrs. Herbert F. 

Britton, N. L. Manual of the flora of the northern states and Canada. 

Wilson, E. H. More aristocrats of the garden. 

McFarland, J. H. Roses of the world in color. 

Rand and Redfield. Flora of Mt. Desert Island, Maine. 
Power, Mrs. Davieson D. 

Copies of "The Mayflower" and of ''American Gardening" 1884-1895 
Ross, Harold S. 

"New Horticultural Hall proposed to be erected on the Public Garden" 

extract from The Boston Herald for January 26, 1887 
Royal Horticultural Society 

A large collection of nursery catalogues. 
TozzER, Mrs. A. M. 

Peterson, C. E. Flower arrangements. 
Tucker, Ethelyn D. M. 

World Almanac 1946 
Whiton, Helen L. 

Daniels Brothers, Norwich, Eng. Illustrated catalogues, Spring and 

Autumn 1887 
Wilson, Mrs. A. C. 

Conder, J. The flowers of Japan and the art of floral arrangement. 



BENEVOLENT FRATERNITY 
FRUIT & FLOWER MISSION 

Reports of the Fruit & Flower Mission liave appeared in this booklet for 
many years. To those who know exactly what this work is, to read that so 
manj^ hundreds of hampers or baskets have been distributed, is indeed a 
justifiable source of pride. 

But to those people who read or hear these reports and have no further 
contact with this work — or its group of devoted volunteers — it may be a 
revelation of what a truly inspiring and unique work has been carried on in 
Boston for the past 80 years by this organization. 

The records show that back in 1869 a young Milton teacher came into 
Boston carrying a bouquet of flowers from her garden to a friend living in the 
city. Besieged by a group of beauty-starved children of the slums, she soon 
had given all her flowers to these youngsters. Touched by the obvious need of 
the joy tliat flowers can bring, she soon had a group of young girls helping her 
distribute, among the tenement dwellers, the flowers that were sent to her by 
generous folks in the suburbs. 

This simple act of friendliness was the seed from which has grown the well- 
organized work of the Fruit & Flower Mission, All down the years this seed 
has been nurtured by the innate kindliness and generosity in human beings. 
Quietly, steadily, friends have appeared when needed to keep the work going 

— reaching ever further out into the towns surrounding Boston and deeper 
into the hearts of those who come into contact with this work and sense its 
underljing motive. 

Churches and settlement houses in Boston opened their doors to the little 
group of women workers as summer headquarters for receiving and distribut- 
ing the thousands of bouquets that were brought in to them. And the number 
of dreary homes that were brightened by these gifts of beauty grew in propor- 
tion. Finally in 1925, the Horticultural Society, which had always contributed 
the flowers from their exhibitions, gave them a room in the Hall as a perma- 
nent headquarters. 

With a 3'ear-round office and a worker always available, that little seed 
began to grow lustily. Now there came into the picture the two phases of the 
work which have continued down to the present time. The so-called "hamper 
work" is the more important as it touches the lives of uncounted numbers 
of people in an ever-widening circle. All summer, from the first of June 
through SejDtember, a steady stream of hampers, cartons, and baskets flows 
into Boston from the outlying suburbs. These liave been filled with flowers, 
fruits and vegetables by interested people, in the suburban towns to be dis- 
tril)uted to the folks living in the congested sections of Boston. 

During the past summer, 856 hampers were received from 32 towns — a 
record in the history of the Mission. But that impressive figure is very small 
compared to the thousands of beautiful bouquets — with their spiritual value 

— that were brought into the homes of people whose only outlook is four 

35 



36 BENEVOLENT FRATERNITY FRUIT AND FLOWER MISSION 

walls of a sick room, or at best, the brick walls of surrounding tenements or 
littered alleys. It is simple enough to count the actual number of flower-filled 
hampers, but impossible to compute the hours of happiness that were brought 
into the lives of the lonely shut-ins by the thoughtfulness of the fortunate 
folks living far from the dirt and noise and heat of the congested districts of 
Boston. 

Looking further behind the record, we see hundreds of men, women and 
children connected with Garden Clubs, Church groups, Youth organizations, 
or individuals interested in helping, busy all through the summer months 
picking flowers and garden produce, carefully packing the containers and 
seeing them off to the local stations, for shipment to Boston. The spirit which 
animates the donors of these gifts has spread to the baggagemen on the local 
trains, for they voluntarily care for the hampers till they reach their destina- 
tions. They have often gone to considerable trouble to repair any hampers 
that they felt might not reach Boston in good condition. All these years the 
railroads have transported these hampers to and from their local stations 
without any charge. 

On arrival at the four distributing centers in Boston, the hampers are un- 
packed and the contents sorted and made ready for distribution by a group 
of eager volunteers living nearby. Here again, mere records are quite inade- 
quate to show what unselfish pleasure these people — many of w^hom have 
never had anything they might share — experience as they go about the 
work of sorting the beautiful blossoms and presenting the bouquets or the 
fresh produce to their tenement house neighbors. 

Another phase of the work of the Fruit & Flower Mission in bringing cheer 
and some measure of comfort, in their own unique fashion, is the preparing 
and filling of hundreds of gift baskets for distribution at Easter, Thanksgiving 
and Christmas. The figures show that during the past year 567 such gifts 
were given to individuals living alone in cheerless little rooms or confined to a 
bed in homes for the aged. ^ ery often families in temporar}'- distress have been 
given a great *4ift" by this thoughtfulness on the part of friends of the Mis- 
sion. The preparing of these gift baskets, and many small gifts that go into 
them along with many packages of daintily wrapped food delicacies, is a 
source of joy not only to the recipients, but also to the group of women who 
spend hours in their preparation. Men and women who help in delivering 
these baskets report that the holidays assume new meaning for them as a 
result of their part in this unusual work. 

Flowers from the exhibits of the Horticultural Society are given to the 
Mission, and in the past year fifty hospitals and various institutions have been 
brightened by these beautiful contributions. But many times fifty individuals 
have been given at least momentary surcease from pain or depression by 
the sight of the lovely blossoms in the wards or sick rooms. 

For many years we have been able to give a rare treat to folks who love 
gardens but who could not afford to indulge in the pleasure of a visit to the 
Annual Spring Flower Show. ^Yhen we record the fact that this year we re- 
ceived forty-five tickets for our distribution, we must rather consider the 
uncounted hours of reminiscent joy that is given to the deeply appreciative 
people who were thus enabled to attend a preview of Spring and Summer — 
these folks to whom Summer is just a season of added discomfort. 



BENEVOLENT FRATERNITY FRUIT AND FLOWER MISSION 37 

In reviewing the work of the Fruit & Flower Mission, we see that it is so 
much more than a record of the numbers of flower-filled hampers and baskets 
of dainties — it is a record of a small devoted group doing, each in her own 
way, what they are best able to do in making this world a bit brighter for 
others. A note of sincere gratitude goes out to everyone who has helped to 
make this, our eighty-first j^ear, so successful. 

Ida a. Perkixs, Executive Secretary 



The Fruit & Flower Mission was saddened by the sudden death of their beloved 
Executive Secretary, Miss Ethel E. Hudson, who passed away on December 24, 1948. 
She was succeeded by Mrs. Ida A. Perkins, on February 1, 1949. These notes on the 
work of the past year were taken from the excellent records of Miss Hudson. 




SPRING FLOWER SHOW 1949 

Grand Hall Jungle Scene during construction 



Report of Officers and Committees 

Presented at the 

ANNUAL MEETING, MAY 2, 1949 

The annual meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society was held at 
Horticultural Hall, Boston, on May 2, 1949, at 3:00 P.M. with the President, 
Mr. John S. Ames, in the chair. He appointed as tellers: Mr. James Geehan, 
Miss Claire Sabadini and Miss Mary Kelly. 

Mr. Arno H. Nehrling, the Executive Secretary, read the call for the meet- 
ing. By vote, the reading of the minutes of the previous annual meeting was 
waived. The following addresses and reports were read: 

The President's Address 

It is most gratifying as President of the Massachusetts Horticultural So- 
ciety to be able to report again that our organization has enjoyed a very 
successful year. 

We now have approximately 12,000 members. This is the largest member- 
ship the Society has ever had in its 120 years of existence. It would be possible 
greatly to increase our membership bj'' an active campaign. However, we have 
preferred to have our membership grow more naturally. That it has increased 
one thousand over last year is a most happy circumstance, since it shows in- 
terest in our Society continues to increase. We have members in practically 
every state in the Union and a number in foreign countries with Canada head- 
ing the list. I may say that plans have been made to continue our membership 
development in an orderly and rational manner, so that we will have a loyal 
and interested group of men and women specifically interested in horticulture 
and in the work of the Society. 

It is my pleasure to report that the Society has received approximately 
$32,000.00 from bequests and other sources. The largest bequest received was 
from the estate of Francis Brown Hayes. The amount was $30,298.86. This 
amount is in addition to the $189,904.54 received in the original bequest from 
Mr.^ Hayes in 1898. It is particularly helpful in that the bequest is not re- 
stricted in any way. From the estate of EUzabeth Downs Wadsworth we re- 
ceived during the past 12 months $593.02. 

You may recall that several years back we launched what we called a 
Greater Endowment Campaign. Contributions to this are still coming in 
without being solicited. The amount received this year was $1,281.30. 

During the year we continued the work of bringing our building up to 
standard. You will remember that during the War this work was necessarily 
curtailed and much needed to be done when we undertook the task at the 
conclusion of hostilities. During the past year all the halls on the lower floor, 
with the exception of Exhibition Hall, were painted. Exhibition Hall, we 
hope, will be painted this coming Summer. A very necessary job was that of 

38 



ANNUAL MEETING 39 

repairing the roof, which was in very bad condition. The roof was repaired in 
all larger portions although a small part yet remains to be done. This section 
has been postponed, because it is of no immediate importance. 

Another project continued durii^ the year was, the cleaning and repairing 
of the portraits from the President's Gallery. Ten more portraits were cleaned 
and repaired during the past year. During the coming months we hope to send 
ten more which should complete the project. We are very proud of the Gallery 
of Presidents. 

Among the other activities of the Society, which I shall mention briefly 
since they will be reported in more detail elsewhere is, first, Horticulture, 
our national garden magazine. You will recall that a year ago we changed our 
publication policy. Instead of publishing 20 times a year we reduced the 
printing to 12. In short we made a standard monthly out of the magazine. 
There were some misgivings at the time but I am delighted to report that the 
change' has proved to be very advantageous. The circulation, after reaching 
a low during the period of conversion, when it was impossible to solicit sub- 
scriptions, has now passed all previous marks. Indications are that the circula- 
tion will continue to increase. We have also continued to develop the editorial 
content of the magazine. Articles of general gardening interest are now in- 
cluded as well as the conventional standard horticultural articles, w^hich form 
such a large part of Horticulture's program. I think it can be said without 
exaggeration that our magazine has now taken its place as a thoroughly mod- 
ern and up-to-date publication specifically designed both to interest the ama- 
teur gardener and also to fulfill the charter obligation of this organization — 
the advancement of horticulture. 

Last year, as you remember, we began a new type of lecture seiies free to 
our members, popular lectures designed to give to audiences as much helpful 
information as possible. Instead of the highly technical and somewhat limited 
topics formerly offered, we broadened the scope of our series so that it reached 
right down into the homes and backyards of everyone. This policy proved 
extremely successful and we have been encouraged to continue it again. The 
program for this year, which will be reported in detail elsewhere, covers about 
every point of horticultural information and inspiration which is of value to 
the amateur gardener. 

During the past tw^elve months the Society staged its usual series of Flower 
Shows throughout the year. The program was difficult but our staff met all the 
various problems triumphantly, and I am very glad to say that the recent 
Spring Flower Show was one of the best that our Society has staged in its long 
historJ^ 

The report on the Spring Show is given elsewhere. I might add that these 
Flow^er Shows held by our Society constitute another outstanding service to 
the public. Once again we are remaining steadfast to our original purpose of 
advancing horticulture. 

Our library has continued to grow and meet its position as one of the great- 
est horticultural libraries in the world. We are in a position to offer to members 
all horticultural information which is in print. The Library Committee will 
report in detail on the library's acti\'ities, but I should empliasize the fact 
that in our hbrary w^e have yet another demonstration of the Society's con- 
tribution to the advancement of horticulture in all its forms. 



40 ANNUAL MEETING 

Before the War the Society was greatly interested in the publication of 
garden and horticultural books, a program which as you all know was success- 
ful. During the War, paper shortages and the absorption of people in other 
interests made it unwise to continue the program and I regret to say that we 
are still hampered by various conditions. In fact, I understand that the book 
publishing business is not even yet in a very healthy condition. We have 
plans to continue our book publications when the situation improves. 

I regret to say that our "Ti-avel Book" which was expected to be issued 
in a new and revised edition this Spring, is again delayed. However, the pub- 
lisher promises that it will be issued in September. For the past few months 
we have also been engaged in rewriting and enlarging the "Plant Buyer's 
Guide". This work is now ready for the printer and we confidently expect it 
will be issued shortly. 

In addition to books, our publications program includes the issuing of bulle- 
tins on various subjects of horticultural interest. We plan during the coming 
months to revise such of our older bulletins which have proved successful and 
for which a demand still exists. Among new bulletins work has already been 
started on one concerned with the subject of ground covers. 

No organization can continue to be successful very long unless it develops 
new activities. I think I may say that our organization's strength is due in no 
small part to our readiness to offer to the public new services as well as to 
undertake new projects. Two activities now being organized demonstrate 
this. First, there is Garden Week in Massachusetts being held between June 
14 and June 20. The Society is sponsoring this program which will open to 
the public more than fifty gardens in and around greater Boston as well as 
down on the North Shore. This Garden Week activity is of course not new. 
It has been practiced successfully in A^irginia, Maryland, Kentucky and other 
states. However, it has never been attempted here. The Society is therefore, 
initiating such a program here and if it proves successful we hope it may 
become a fixture. 

Another project on which we are embarked is the observance of the cen- 
tennial of the Concord grape. We plan to hold this in conjunction with our 
Harvest Show in September. This time was chosen since the Concord grape 
ripens in that month and it will therefore be exactly one hundred years from 
the time Ephraim Bull picked his first Concord grape. We have most ambitious 
plans for the observance. An executive committee has been appointed and a 
Concord committee is in the process of formation. We have sought the issue 
of a commemorative stamp by the United States Government. Articles have 
been prepared and placed in the national magazines. As Fall draws on we will 
perfect plans for an active observance both here at Horticultural Hall and in 
Concord. 

As to the future of the Society, I am sure I express the belief of all our 
Trustees and officers as well as our members, when I state we are in a most 
excellent position. There is much to be done and there are difficulties ahead, 
but I think we may look forward confidently to a continued growth in our 
membership and a constant development of our facilities to give to members 
and to all gardeners in America, the very best and late^ garden help and 
horticultural knowledge. 

John S. Ames, President 



ANNUAL MEETING 41 

Report of the Secretary 

As our President has just reported, the Society has enjoyed a very satisfac- 
tory year with our membership increasing to approximately twelve thousand. 
We are the largest Horticultural Society in this countr3^ As a matter of fact 
only the Royal Horticultural Society of London has a larger membership than 
ours. At the present time we have a campaign under way and as a result we 
hope to report an even larger membership next year at this time. 

Our President has touched upon most of our activities in his report and it 
is my privilege to enlarge somewhat upon his remarks. First of all I would 
like to mention Horticulture, one of our major prgjects. We are the 
only Society in the country that publishes a national magazine devoted to 
gardening. In addition to our regular subscription list, our magazine goes to 
the members of the Horticultural Society of New York, the Pennsylvania 
Horticultural Society and, since the first of the year, to the members of the 
Michigan Horticultural Society. 

We are entering a period in the field of journalism in which competition for 
both readers and advertisers is very keen. With Horticulture now in 
modern form, we are prepared to meet the challenge of the competitive days 
ahead. Since the numbers reached is the standard upon which advertising is 
largely based we considered it necessary last fall to increase our circulation. 
In response to a small carefully planned campaign, we obtained nearly five 
thousand additional subscribers. This campaign, I am delighted to sa}^, more 
than paid for itself. Since the Society has for its goal a subscription list of 
fifty thousand, we are at present engaged in a second campaign which we hope 
will be as successful as our first effort. 

In March, Mr. Edwin F. Steffek, Associate Editor of our magazine Horti- 
culture and our staff horticulturist, resigned to become associated with the 
staff of HOUSE BEAUTIFUL. Mr. George Taloumis, who comes to us 
well recommended, has been engaged in his place. 

During the year members of our staff have been kept busy with their rou- 
tine duties, and as their time allowed, they have given lectures on gardening 
and horticultural subjects to various groups. In order to keep in touch with 
what is going on in the horticultural world some staff members have attended 
important meetings in different sections of the country. Mr. William H. 
Clark, Editor of Horticulture, attended the annual meeting of the 
Men's Garden Clubs of America in Atlanta, Georgia. He also visited the 
Horticultural Society of New York and the Pennsylvania Horticultural 
Society to discuss our mutual activities. During the year he visited many of 
the outstanding gardens, nurseries and points of prominence to gardeners 
throughout the East. 

Mr. Aubrey Butler, one of our Vice Presidents, represented the Society at 
the meeting of the Arthur Hoyt Scott Foundation at Swarthmore, Pennsyl- 
vania. At this meeting the Arthur Hoyt Scott Medal, which is given for out- 
standing service to horticulture, was awarded to Miss Ellen Eddy Shaw of 
the BrookljTi Botanic Garden for her work in the field of nature study. 

At the close of the Spring Flower Show several of our staff visited the New 
York and Philadelphia Flower Shows. Miss Newton, Mr. Clark and your 
Secretary visited both exhibitions. Miss Newton, while in New York also 
attended the meetings of the Special Libraries Association. During the course 



42 ANfKUAL MEETING 

of the year Miss \l«nk«, our Khfarian, iju.. ^rip to Xcw Ymk to study 

spedal proUems at the libmy of the New Botanical Garden. 

Your SeoctaiT made a trip to Miami in December, for the pmpoae of pre- 
senting the Gemse Robert White Medal of Honor to Mr. Ernest F. Coe. 
yb. Coe is knoim as tiie Father of the Ewisbdes National Fuk, and al- 
thoogjh he has leoeiYed many honois for his work, he eonsidered our medal 
one of the ontBtanding reoognitions of his long career. While in Jtliaml, your 
^^eoelaiy abo selected much of the plant material whidi was used in the 
tit^iical scene at the recent Spring Flower Show. Presidait Ames, and your 
Seoetaiy attended the recent annual reunion of the Worcester County 
Horticultural Socifity . I am pleased to rqiort that a fine spirit of cooperation 
ciisftB between thrae two Mpmiitioig. 

Only last weA I had the privilege of attending the great Gahfoniia Spiring 
Garden Show held in Oakland, Galifoniia. Tins is the laigest and most spec- 
tacular edufaition I ha^e ever seen. Hie ^bam is held in two laige bukfings 
whk^ are tied togetho- with a court yard containing a series of gudens. The 
laTish me of plant material was breaUi taking and will long be remembered. I 
mi^t add the puipose of my Tisit was to obtain new ideas for future exhibi- 
tions of the Society. 

While I was in Los Alleles Mr. Wm. Rodman, who has dbaige of the In- 
tenialional Cafiffonua Spring Flower Show, and your Secretary accepted an in- 
Titation to attend the Coronado Spring Fkvwer Show. The Show is eondueted 
by retired army and navy officers. They are tremendous^ interested in this 
ediifaition and as a result this has become one <rf the largest and most inter- 
estii^ flower allows hekl <m tibe West Coast. 

yir. Ames has reported on the repairs made to the buildnig during the year 
and has also mentioned the use whidi is being made of the buildiiig by otgui- 
intioiis related to our Society. Horticultural Hall has become the outstand- 
ing center for horticultural activities in New England as wdl as attracting 
Tazious i»«*i«»«l oiguuBdians for their armual meetingSw I thoq^it our 
membeis miglit be interested in the o^guuntions that meet regidai^ in 
HortacnltDral HaD. Among these are tiie Gaiden Club Federation of Maasa- 
diu ae UH ^ The Associated Flower Anangers of Maasadmsetfes, New England 
Wild Fkiwer Pkeservatkn Society, The Xew Ei^hmd GbufioiiB Sodety, 
The Gourd Society of America, the Hert> Society <tf America, the American 
Rock Gardm Society, the Gardenera and Fkrats Cfaib of Boston, the Boston 
brandi of the American Aseocialian of Gardenera, the New Rngjbmd Iris 
Society, the New Engjbnd bnndi of the American Ir^ Society, the New Eng- 
land Rose Society, the Aiborisbs Aasodalkm and the Boston Men^s Garden 
Oub. 

Mr. Ames has rcfiened to our program of lecturer I am pleased to rqnrt 
that the present series is already in ptug ie as and proviiig Tcry sneeeBsfiiL The 
first lecture pvetk by Dr. G^gut of tiie WaMiam KeM Station was wdl a;t- 
tended. Tiie following lectures are still on our srhednle: May 3, "FkyweR in 
Action" fay John Nadi Ott; Mky 7, "Tlie Commeraal Growii« of Mosii- 
rooms" by Dr. C. Aubrey Thomas; May 12, "Food from Tour Own Back 
Yard" by Henry Wendler; May 19, ''The ABC's of Garden Fhnning" by 
Dorotliea Hanison: M&y 26, "Small Fnnt^ in the Suburinn Yard" by Prof. 
A. P. FrendL 



ANNUAL MEETING 43 

I am sorry to report that there has been another delay in the pubhcation of 
our ''Travel Book". However, the publisher promises that it will be ready in 
September, in time for the holiday book market. The ''Plant Buyer's Guide" 
on which we have been working for a long time is almost ready for the printer. 
As soon as pubhshing costs become normal again we are planning to publish a 
number of books on important horticultural subjects. We also plan to con- 
tinue the publishing of bulletins and to revise a number for which there is a 
great demand. As a matter of fact we have already started work on a bulletin 
on ground covers, a subject on which little information is available. Barring 
delays this should be ready for distribution early in the Fall. 

The past few months members of the staff devoted considerable time to the 
preliminary organization work for "Garden Week in Massachusetts". This 
project is under the competent direction of Miss Mary May Binney, Chair- 
man of the Committee appointed to carry on this activity. The Committee 
has obtained a long list of gardens which will be opened to the public from 
June 14 to 20. We are very enthusiastic about this new project. 

The Concord grape centennial, which will be observed this September at 
the time of our Fall Show should prove to be an interesting event. Our plans 
are not yet completed save for the preliminary organization of committees and 
the placing of publicity in national magazines. We plan to have widespread 
newspaper and radio coverage during the week and many prominent people 
are being invited to share in the anniversary celebration which will be held 
here at Horticultural Hall. 

A detailed financial report on the condition of the Society will be presented 
by the Treasurer. I am happy to report however, that even with with our in- 
creased activities, our finances are on a sound basis. This is due to the very 
careful management exercised by our Finance Committee. 

Our various Flower Shows will be reported upon later by the Chairman of 
the Exhibition Committee. I feel that we had a very successful and satis- 
factory year and we are proud of our Flower Show program which has con- 
tinued without a break since the Society was organized in 1829. 

It is my sad duty to report the recent passing of Samuel J. Goddard of 
Framingham a member of our Board of Trustees. For a good many years Mr. 
Goddard was chairman of the Children's Show Committee. He also served on 
both the Exhibition and Prize Conamittees. 

Through the death of Mrs. Hollis Webster the Society lost one of its most 
active workers. Mrs. Webster, an authority on herbs, gave much of her time 
to the work of our organization. Her interest and enthusiasm for all things 
horticultural were an inspiration to all who knew her. 

Later you will be given a report on the library. However, it pleases me to 
state that we have the largest horticultural library in America and its collec- 
tion of more than thirty thousand bound volumes is being used not only by 
our local members, but by members all over the country who borrow books 
by mail. Our Ubrary is also of great value to men and women working on 
special horticultural subjects. As usual the library staff operated the Informa- 
tion Booth at the Spring Flower Show. This is an educational service of great 
value as it gives to Show visitors the opportunity of discussing garden prob- 
lems and garden books with members of our staff. The library staff was ably 
assisted in this work by members of the Waltham Field Station and the 



44 ANNUAL MEETING 

Arnold Arboretum. These two fine organizations are always willing to co- 
operate with our Society in every way possible. 

In conclusion. I wish to express my appreciation for the loyal support I 
have received from the men and women with whom I have worked during the 
past year. I trust that I may enjoy the same support and cooperation in the 
future. The Society, now in its 121st year, is in a soUd position financially, 
and contemplates a planned project of ever enlarging ser^dces not only to its 
members but to the countrj' as a whole. What is ahead no one knows but no 
one of us doubts that the future is great. The importance of horticulture in 
America will continue to grow and our Society will continue to grow and serve 
our members and the horticultural public as efficiently and effectively as is 
po.ssible in the years ahead. 

Arxo H. Xehrlixg, Executive Secretary 

Report of the Exhibitions Committee 

Thanks to the interest on the part of all members of the Exhibitions Com- 
mittee in attending its numerous meetings and in developing ideas regarding 
individual shows the group has functioned efhciently during the past year. 
Ten meetings were held, and although all members of this group were ap- 
praised of the operations of the Prize Committee, no joint meeting of the two 
committees was required, indicating that operations in which both committees 
were interested were functioning unusually y\e\\. 

Ten shows were held under the direction of the Show ^Manager and the 
Committee. The total attendance at the smaller shows was larger than in 
pre\'ious years, although the actual attendance at the Autumn Exhibition was 
about 1800 less than in 1947. The Lily Show, held in conjunction Tsith the 
annual meeting of the North American Lily Society, was the largest and most 
successful lilj' exhibition ever held in this country. 

The Spring Show attendance totaled 110,197 as compared with 115,746 in 
1948, the decrease due largely to adverse weather conditions on one day. It 
was an unusual and distinctly successful show. The profits were less than in 
the previous year, because of decreased attendance, but still were in excess of 
the amount that the officials of the society had indicated as the minimum 
required to maintain the desired budget for the year. Grand Hall was handled 
as a unit by the Society with the cooperation of selected exhibitors. The basic 
theme was a tropical jungle. The Committee and the Society are greatly in- 
debted to all who cooperated to make the exhibition in Grand Hall the out- 
standing success it proved to be. Working out the plans and setting up the 
large palms involved special services on the part of Mr. Max Cohen, Mr. 
Egbert Hans, Mr. Harold Stevenson, and Mr. William Frank. The lighting 
effects imder the supervision of Mr. C. Hassler Capron were developed to a 
point distinctly beyond the expectation of the committee. 

Among those who loaned tropical plants for the jungle scene to be especially 
mentioned is Wellesley College, Mr. Walter Hunnewell, and Mr. Ernest Logee. 
For the most unusual orchid exhibit, the objective being to show the plants 
more or less as they occur in nature, we are indebted for the loan of numerous 
specimens to Mr. Edwin S. Webster, Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, Mrs. Robert Treat 
Paine, 2nd, Mr. Francis W. Hunnewell, Mr. Dunbar Lockwood, and Mr. 



ANNUAL MEETING 45 

George W. Butterworth. The flowering acacias exhibited by Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Stone massed at one end of Grand Hall, never showed up to better 
advantage in any previous exhibition. 

One of the outstanding features of the show outside of Grand Hall was the 
exhibit planned and developed by the Women's Exhibitions Committee of 
the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. We are under constant appre- 
ciation to this outstanding group which functions year after year at the 
Spring Show, and always with distinctively new features. We are also, as 
usual, indebted to the numerous nurserymen, private growers, and specialists 
in this or that group of plants, whose exhibits year after year contribute so 
much to the success of the Spring Show. After all, it is the financial success of 
the Spring Show that enables the Society to function successfully, and without 
restriction of its services to horticulture, year after year, for approximately 
one-third of the annual budget of the Society is drawn from Spring Show 
profits; and, incidentally, these profits also enable the Society to stage its 
numerous free smaller shows throughout the year. In Boston, in marked con- 
trast to the situation in other horticultural centers in this country, the Massa- 
chusetts Horticultural Society is the sole beneficiary in relation to the financial 
returns from the Spring Show, as it is the organization that sponsors all ex- 
hibits. It would be, in case of a financially unsuccessful exhibition, the loser. 
Here, however, a reserve fund from profits of the Spring Shows and unex- 
pended income from unrestricted funds, now amounting to $54,000.00, has 
been built up over a term of years to protect the Society against the chance of 
an unsuccessful season. Largely because of a long series of financially success- 
ful Spring Shows the Massachusetts Horticultural Society is in a most satis- 
factory position. This is a reflection of the wisdom of those who originated the 
plan and those who sponsored the establishment of an ample reserve show fund. 

As chairman of the Exhibitions Comimittee I wish to express my sincere 
appreciation to all members of the Committee, to the Show Manager who 
works very closely with the Committee, and to all exhibitors for their disin- 
terested efforts to make all of our numerous exhibitions successful. It is an 
excellent example of cooperation on the part of all interested parties the net 
result being that the Massachusetts Horticultural Society is by far the largest, 
and clearly the most outstanding and productive organization of its kind in 
America. 

E. D. Merrill, Chairman 

Report of the Committee on Prizes 

In making this Annual Report I am doing so in place of one who has always 
been one of the best loved and stanch supporters of the Horticultural So- 
ciety. One whom I have known since 1915, when I first helped place an exhibit 
in this hall. He was always willing and his good advice and helping hand was 
greatly appreciated by the exhibitors. The death of Mr. Samuel Goddard 
brought sorrow to the members of this committee, as well as loss to the 
Society. 

Mr. Ames very kindly added Mr. James Methven, a past chairman of the 
prize committee for a number of years, as the fifth member for the Spring 
Show. 



46 ANNUAL MEETING 

The committee on prizes has judged at S allows during the past year, and 
has had excellent cooperation from the exhibitors and members of the exhibi- 
tion committee. The committee also has held five meetings during the year 
in preparation for the laig^ shows and was assisted by Mr. Nduling, our 
very able secretary, as well as his assistant Mis. Qara Lewis, and the com- 
mittee wishes to thank them at this time. 

At Uie smaU^ ^ows the committee judged the exhibits wiUi the assistance 
of one or two experte. For several years this has beoi the rule for these diows, 
as it is necessary for the prize committee to be in attendance at all shows of 
the Society. This plan seems to work out very satisfactorily. 

At the recent Spring Flower Show the committee did not have a single 
protest, which I am happy to report. 

I wish to take tiiis opportunity to thank the other memb^s of the pruK 
committee for the able assistance and faithfulness to a difficult task at times. 
I wish also to express my appreciation, and that of the other members of tiie 
committee, to those judges who are called in, by the committee, to assist than 
at the larger shows. They are to be highly complimented on their sp!«idid 
wofk. 

RespectfuOy submitted, 

Thomas Miln-e, Co-Chairman 



Report of the Committee on Children's Gardens 

Due to severe iUnes-. : r _iirman of the committee, Samur. . .1: :. 

was not able to take an active part in the preparation of tiie 1948 Children's 
Show. Unfortunately. Mr. Goddard has passed on and his excellent guidance 
will be missed at future shows. 

The number of entries at the Children's Show last year showed a remark- 
able increase over 1947 due in part to the very favorable growing conditions. 
In the School and Home Garden Section there was a total of 1101 entries, an 
iucrease of 419 ovw tiie previous year. The 4-H Qub Section had 399 entries 
showing an increase of 170. 

The quality of the vegetables was extremely high for a Children's Show. 
Much overcrowding has been eliminated and in the school garden exhibits 
excellent backgrounds were arranged adding much to the genial appearance 
of the show. Several of the school gard^i exhibits compared favorably with 
those staged by adult exhUntois at other shows. At tiie dose of the show the 
diildren again presented the vegetables, fruits and flowas on exhibition to 
the Fruit and Flower Mission. Miss Ethel E. Hudson, the former executive 
secretary of this oigianiiation. was elated with tiie generous amount and qual- 
ity of tiie matoiaL I have a very fine letter from tiie late Ifiss Hudscm (oi- 
closed) thanking the children for their contributions. 

The vegietables, fruits and flowers were soit to ho^Htals, homes Ux aged 
women and other oiiganixations on the list of the Fruit and Flower M^saon. 

Attendance at the show increased considoaWy with the pubUc being some- 
what surprised at the fine work the children are dcmig, some of whom will be 
the future members and exhibitors of the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Societv. 



ANNUAL MEETING 47 

The 4-H Club exhibit in the upper hall under the supervision of Mr. Earle 
H. Nodine, Assistant State Club Leader, as usual, was of very high quality 
and a credit to all. 

Judges found the awarding of prizes difficult in many of the classes in both 
sections of the show. This can easily be understood when it is not uncommon 
to have forty or fifty entries in many of the individual plate classes. 

As a member of the Committee presenting this report on the Children's 
Garden Show for 1948, I take this opportunity at the annual meeting of 
thanking the Horticultural Society for their helpful interest and genuine 
assistance to the School Garden movement. I especially appreciate the con- 
tagious enthusiasm of Secretary Arno Nehrling and the great assistance given 
by Mr. Joy and his staff at Horticultural Hall. The entire personnel of the 
Society office has been of great assistance to us. 

As is perhaps better known in other sections of the country than in Massa- 
chusetts, the Massachusetts Horticultural Society was the pioneer in estab- 
lishing school garden work in the United States, when in the early 90 's they 
sent Mr. Henry Clark, Master of the George Putnam School, to Europe to 
study gardening as conducted in the European schools. Mr. Clark founded the 
school garden work in America with his first garden in Roxbury, Massa- 
chusetts. 

In Cleveland, an outstanding school garden city, I found that they give 
great credit to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society for their leadership 
in all horticultural activities. Cleveland is a horticultural city and I think 
that no small credit is due to the ably led school garden movement there. I 
quote from the last report of Mr. Paul R. Young, Supervisor of School Gar- 
dens for the Board of Education in Cleveland : 

'^ School Gardens Produce People — Cleveland's school gardens are success- 
ful horticulturally, for otherwise they can hardly be successful educationally. 
The real product, however, is people — • girls and boys with foundations of 
character, information, and health established, which will make them good 
citizens. 

Children with garden plots are engaging in a real life-size enterprise. They 
experience the dignity and pride that come when one actually produces, with 
his own hands and skill. They see the rewards of honest work and the penal- 
ties of neglect, things a garden can teach most effectively. They learn to 
follow directions, obey rules, observe property rights, assume individual and 
social responsibilities, respect beauty, and to await results with patience. 
Neatness, orderliness, promptness, honesty, industry and fair play are all 
traits of character that grow in the properly managed school garden, along 
with the crops. The children themselves grow physically, with the healthful 
exercise in the fresh air and sunshine. 

Any youngster who conducts a garden on one of these school tracts for even 
one season, is given a fundamental training in the basic arts of gardening that 
will be a vital and functioning part of his life from that time on. He has grown 
a successful garden, and has laid a foundation for at least one worthy activity 
in life, whether a hobby or a vocation. 

School Gardens Improve the Community — The well conducted school 
garden not only benefits the pupils working there, but it sets standards for the 
whole community. Successful garden practices demonstrated by their own 



48 ANNUAL MEETING 

children are adopted by many parents untrained and inexperienced in gar- 
dening. New and improved varieties of vegetables, flowers, and shrubs are 
demonstrated and "sold" to the community. Adults seek training for them- 
selves. Standards of home yard planting are raised by the school garden 
examples. Community improvement may well radiate from the school 
garden." 

The prospects for the 1949 season in school gardening work and for the 
August Children's Show are ven* promising. We are getting an eariy start 
this year, some two weeks earUer than usual, and elemental^ schools are 
closing in Boston at 2:00 p.m. instead of 3:30 as in previous years. This should 
result in a considerable increase in interest on the part of the children of these 
schools. 

I hope that many members of the Horticultural Society will be interested 
enough in this movement to visit the Children's Garden Show in August. 

D-^-iEL W. O'Briex 
M ember of the Commiti^ on Children's Gardens 

Report of the Library Committee 

During the year, 459 volumes were added to the Hbrary, the total now 

being 29.517. As usual, the additions consisted of new pubhcations, carefully 
selected items representing the older Uterature, and current periodicals as the 
volumes were completed and boimd. A serious attempt is made to keep the 
hbrary up to date in current Hterature, and at the same time to acquire cer- 
tain important older works as they are offered by dealers. It seems desirable 
here to mention the fact that within the past few years prices quoted by 
dealers for older works have increased enormously; and at the same time, 
because of present economic conditions, prices for newly published volumes 
are necessarily high. 

Fortunately the income from certain endowment funds restricted to the 
purchase of books, has more than suflSced to cover the cost of needed ac- 
cessions, yet constant and critical care is needed in making selections. Perhaps 
illustrative of the situation from the dealers' standpoint was an offering of 
a certain volume at $45.00, when, as a matter of fact, the work involved is 
actually in print, and new copies may be secured through any dealer for 
$12.50 — and the dealer who optiDoistically offered a single second hand copy 
at a grossly exaggerated price could have acquired from the publishers several 
hundred copies at the going price of -$12.50 per copy less 40 per cent the 
standard discount to dealers. However, fortunate as the Society is in ha\'ing 
these restricted funds for the purchase of books, all expenses for care of the 
hbrary must be pro^dded from its general income; and this, the major cost of 
maintaining the hbrar^', including the recataloging, has reached a rather high 
level, yet fortunately the Society has been able to provide the necessary- fimds. 

One of the real services of the Society is in the loan of books to members. 
Thus in* the year just closed, nearly 4500 volumes were loaned. Naturally 
many of these loans are local, but sendings amounting to 147S packages were 
mailed to members, and occasionally institutions, in all parts of the country*. 
It is beUeved that this is a real service to our members, especially those who 
hve in small communities, and others who reside in large centers where spe- 



ANNUAL MEETING 49 

cialized horticultural libraries do not exist. As interest in horticulture de- 
velops, the demand for this service increases. However, in the case of certain 
very rare and expensive volumes, and those which are in constant demand for 
reference purposes, are never loaned. Here, however, photostats and micro- 
film can be supplied at cost. 

A number of gifts have been received from friends of the Society, and a 
complete list will be published in the Year Book. Worthy of special mention 
here are two cases of nursery catalogues, a gift from the Royal Horticultural 
Society of London, and a bequest of books from the estate of Alice H. Burrage 
(Mrs. Albert C. Burrage). 

The maintainance of the library and its services to the members is an 
important activity of the Society. As has often been stated, we maintain the 
largest specialized horticultural library in America, its holdings supplementing 
those of the several larger specialized botanical libraries in the Boston area in 
an excellent manner; and through the library service operated under the 
auspices of the Harvard library, special volumes not available elsewhere are 
loaned within the Boston area as needed, and at the same time volumes re- 
quested, but not available in our library, may be borrowed for use in Horti- 
cultural Hall. This inter-library loan service is a most valuable one. 

No complete record has been maintained regarding the number of in- 
dividuals who actually consult the library, but the number is very great, and 
tends to increase. Information is freely supplied to visitors and to corre- 
spondents on a great variety of subjects, and every effort is made to meet each 
request for assistance by providing accurate sources of information. Thus 
through its library and the library activities the Society renders outstanding 
special services to its members not only in the community but throughout the 
country. 

Because of the large accumulation of unneeded duplicate books, particu- 
larly those from the Albert C. Burrage bequest, the librarian was directed to 
prepare a list, and I undertook to add reasonable prices, which were always 
between what a dealer would offer and his selling price. In due time, the Ust 
was completed and mimeographed copies were distributed to specialized 
libraries, the larger pubhc libraries, and educational institutions. As prices 
now go, those placed on these duplicate books represented bargains, but in 
this case all the profits redounded to the Society for the support of its library 
activities rather than to dealers. It is recommended that when the accumula- 
tion of unwanted duplicate books so warrants, a second list of offerings be 
made. An attempt is made to give members of the Society a preferred position 
when such sales are made. 

The recataloging of the library has been in progress for about six years, 
on a part time basis, but is far from completion. To date, approximately 
$10,000.00 has been expended on this activity, which is perhaps two-thirds 
complete. At the present rate of progress, the recataloging should be com- 
pleted in three or four years. 

Meetings of the Committee have been held from time to time as requested 
by the librarian. However, by official action of the Committee, authorizing the 
librarian to make purchases at her discretion where only modest sums were 
involved and further giving the Chairman some discretion in special cases to 
act for the Committee, has somewhat reduced the number of meetings. Some- 



/ 



50 ANNUAL MEETING 

times, when a specially desired item is offered by a dealer, very prompt action 
is needed so that an order may be placed without delay if we are to acquire 
the volume. 

Suggestions from members as to titles of special works which should be 
acquired, as well as comments and ideas which might tend to the development 
of a better hbrary service are always welcome. We hope that all members of 
the Society ^ill feel free to avail themselves of the excellent hbrary service 
that is maintained by the Society. 

E. D. Merrill, Chairman 

Report of the Treasurer 

I am happy to say that my first report as Treasurer of the Society shows 
very gratifying results for the year of 1948. I hope that all the reports that I 
may make during my term of oflfice will be as satisfactory as this one. Some- 
times I wonder if our members realize the size and scope of the Society's 
operations. For example, our total expenses for the year of 1948 amounted to 
$329,082. That is a lot of money and represents literally thousands of separate 
expenditures covering a bewildering variety of items from the purchase of rare 
old books for the hbrary to organ music at our Spring Show. As the amount of 
expenditures would suggest, our activities in the field of horticulture are very 
wide-spread and in this post-war period of greatly increased costs, it has been 
a source of pride to the Officers and Trustees that we have not been forced, as 
yet, to cut down on our educational and promotional work in behalf of our 
members ^nd the general pubUc. 

As I have said, our total expenses were $329,082. Against these expendi- 
tures, we had a total income of $338,189, lea\ing an excess of income over 
expenditures of $9,107. This compares with an excess of income over expendi- 
tures in 1947 that amounted to $3,642. 

Our aims and objectives in the Society are not related to making money but 
if we should run into a period of operating losses, our funds would be reduced 
and consequently our effectiveness in promoting horticultural activities and 
serving our members and the general pubhc would suffer. Hence it is always 
pleasant to have our income cover our expenses with something to spare. 

Contributing to the good results for 1948 were increased income from our 
investment funds, a very successful Spring Show and somewhat higher 
membership income. The results, moreover, were achieved in the face of higher 
expenditures on maintaining and improving our building, total building ex- 
pense bemg $35,472 in 1948 as against $32,280. in 1947. These figures include 
all salaries in connection with the physical operation of the building. 

I shall not inflict upon you any recital of the many figures that comprise our 
audited financial report. They are available, however, for any of our members 
who would like to peruse them. Summarizing again, in review, we had a 
gratifying surplus of income over expenses for 1948 amounting to $9,107, and 
our financial position with respect to our invested funds and cash balances 
remained strong. 

I shall not attempt to forecast our 1949 results. Some of us who fancied 
that we could read the crystal ball learned a lesson last November that 
should keep us permanently out of the fortune telling profession. 



ANNUAL MEETING 



51 



Our 1949 Spring Show was a tremendous artistic success and very satisfac- 
tory from a financial point of view but probably somewhat below last year in 
this respect, and our expenses will remain heavy, so if we succeed in covering 
our total outgo, even though by a smaller margin than in 1948, I, for one 
shall not be unhappy. 



May 2, 1949. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Stedman Buttrick, Treasurer 





A Typical Flower Show Flower Arrangement 



52 ANNUAL MEETING 

REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION ON 
DECEMBER 31, 1948 

ASSETS 

Cash in banks and on hand $ 44,409. 74 

Treasurer: In bank $ 30,280. 53 

Bursar: In Bank 14,104. 21 

On hand 25 00 

$ 44,409.74 

Investments valued at book value 777,157. 68 

Capital Assets 592,586.38 

Real Estate $498,564.63 

Improvements and Additions to Building. . $ 47,441.28 

Library 46,580.47 

$592,586.38 

Deferred Charge: 

Spring Show, 1949 4,371.29 

$1,418,525.09 

LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL FUNDS 

Liabilities: Accounts payable. $ 5,990.68 

Sundry Funds 577,012. 50 

Special Uses : 

Principal $167,326. 62 

Unexpended income 8,740.74 

$176,067.36 
General uses : 
Principal 400,945.14 

$577,012.50 

Greater Endowment Fund 36,741 . 46 

Balance, January 1, 1948 35,460. 16 

Net addition — 1948 1,281.30 

$ 36,741.46 

Life Membership fees 30,235.00 

Mount Auburn Cemetery Fund 55,053 . 52 

Show Insurance Fund 54,287. 56 

Capital 564,524.70 

Surplus (Capital) 81,929 . 72 

Surplus (Earned) 12,749.95 

Balance, January 1, 1948 3,642. 44 

Transferred from Profit and Loss 9,107. 51 



$ 12,749.95 



:,418,525.09 



ANNUAL MEETING 53 

STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 

INCOME 

1948 1947 

Income from investments $ 40,981 . 53 $ 38,691 . 81 

Membership fees 16,370. 69 15,702. 69 

Rentals 11,217.11 11,507.87 

Spring Show 71,490. 66 75,158. 67 

Autumn Show 2,856.87 1,087.86 

Horticulture Income or Loss 4,690.43 160.31 

Other receipts 818.05 3,680.88 

$133,340.74 $145,669.47 

EXPENDITURES 

Building expenses $ 35,472.55 $ 32,280.46 

Library expenses 12,232.89 13,869.46 

Office and general salaries and expenses 43,075. 75 52,351 . 14 

Miscellaneous exhibition expenses 5,407.84 3,647.85 

Lectures paid from general funds 218.65 112.43 

Prizes, medals and certificates paid from 

General Funds 2,890. 52 7,638. 75 

Prizes, medals and certificates paid from 

Spring Show 20,286.56 28,438.00 

Medals, lectures, etc. paid from Restricted 

Funds 2,751.11 1,884.00 

Awards at Shows paid from Restricted Funds . . 3,932 . 82 2,735 . 87 

Other payments 100. 00 

$126,268.69 $143,057.96 

Excess of Income over Expenditures, All 

Funds. 7,072.05 2,611.51 

Deduct: Difference between current income 

additions and current expenses charged 

on restricted funds 2,035.46 1,030.93 

Excess of Income over Expenditures — General 

Funds $ 9,107.51 $ 3,642.44 



RESULT OF THE BALLOTING 

At 4:00 o'clock the polls were closed, 77 votes having been cast, and the 
following persons were declared elected : 

President: — John S. Ames. 

Vice President: Aubrey B. Butler. 

Trustees: (For three years) George W. Butterworth, Mrs. John Gardner 
Coolidge, George Lewis, Jr., Oliver Wolcott and Dr. R. A. Van Meter. 

Trustee: (For one year) Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby. 



NECROLOGY 



A list of the members of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society whose 
deaths were reported during the year ending May 1, 1949. 



Mrs. Gordon Abbott 
Mr. Joseph Armstrong 
Mrs. Charles P. Bancroft 
Mrs. Edward M. Barnex 
Mrs. Louis T. Bartlett 
Miss Agnes L. Berry 
Miss Isabella A. Bissett 
Miss Annie R. Blanchard 
Mr. Archibald Blanchard 
Mrs. Harold W. Blood 
Mr. Hendry G. Bradlee 
Mrs. John D. Brewer 
Mrs. Hentiy Brooks 
Mr. Charles F. Bugbee 
Mr. Allston Bltir 
Mrs. Albert C. Bltirage 
Mrs. T. Francis Capeles 
Mr. Andrew Christensen 
Miss Carita Clarke 
Miss Julia F. Clary 
Dr. Fred A. Coughlin 
Mr. Cil^rles P. Cltitis 
Mrs. Cilarles H. Cutler 
Rev. Louis C. Dethlefs 
Mrs. Robert G. Dodge 
Mr. Clarence M. Ellis 
Mrs. E. L. Ellis 
Mr. John S. Fernald - 
Mr. Du'ncan Finlayson 
Mr. Rollin B. Fisher 
Mrs. Charles E. Fitz 
Mrs. Homer Gage 
Mr. Frank D. Gavin 
Mrs. W. H. Glover 
Mr. Samuel J. Goddard 
Mr. L. B. Goodale 
Miss Isabel M. Goodwin 
Mr. Robert Melrose Grey 
Mrs. George G. Hall 
Mr. Charles L. Harding 
Mr. Jesse E. Haynes 
Mrs. Andrew H. Hepburn 
Mr. Arthur Dehon Hill 
Mrs. Lucius W. Hitchcock 
Mrs. Charles W. Hobbs 
Mr. Charles S. Hopkinson 



Mr. E. R. Horton 
Mr. Fred H. Howard 
Mr. Norman Howden 
Miss Ethel E. Hudson 
Mrs. Albert F. Hunt 
Mr. Robert T. Jackson 
Mr. William K. Jackson 
Mrs. Louisa C. James 
Mrs. Charles G. Keene 
Mrs. Edward L. Kent 
Mrs. Margery A. Ketchum 
Mr. William N. Kimball 
Miss M. Frances Kingsbury 
Mr. C. M. Koopman 
Mr. Harry V. Long 
Mr. Frank B. Lowe 
Mr. Eugene Lutz 
Mrs. J. L. MacIntyre 
Miss Fanny P. Mason 
Miss E. N. Matthews 
Mr. J. Horace McFarland 
Mr. Walter S. McKenzie 
Mrs. W. p. Montgomery 
Mrs. Clifford H. Moore 
Miss Angela J. Morris 
Mr. Harry G. Morton 
Mr. Harry A. Norton 
Mr. John A. Odiorne 
Mrs. Jensmith O'Neil 
Miss Florence Ormerod 
Mrs. Along H. Paine 
Miss Ruth Palmer 
Mr. Chauncey David Parker 
Mrs. Herman Parker 
Mr. Ross Parker 
Mr. John Pino 
Mr. Harold A. Pitman 
Miss Kate Potter 
Miss An^na L. Prichard 
Mrs. J. Hampden Robb 
Miss Carrie M. Robbins 
Mr. Miles Roberts 
Mr. George W. Rogers 
Mrs. How\'\.rd L. Rogers 
Miss Lucy C. Ross 
Mr. James B. Shea 



54 



NECROLOGY continued 



Mr. Everett N. Slade 
Miss Laura Slocum 
Mr. John T. Spaulding 
Miss Alice Stackpole 
Mr. Moses T. Stevens 
Miss Evelyn R. Sturgis 
Mr. Henry B. Swearingen 
Mrs. Earl W. Taylor 
Mrs. Walter E. Tobie 



Mrs. Josephine M. Valentine 
Mr. Stephen F. Wadsworth 
Mrs. Hollis Webster 
Mrs. Elsie M. Wheeler 
Mr. Myron S. Wheeler 
Mr. Akthur D. Whitcomb 
Mrs. F. E. Wigglund 
Mrs. Clarence C. Williams 
Miss Ellen M. Yerhington 




SPRING FLOWER SHOW 1949 

Wild Garden staged by Kelsey-Highlands Nursery. 



55 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

1942 Lord Aberconts'ay, North Wales, England 

1942 F. A. Bartlett, Stamford, Connecticut 

1942 Walter D. Browxell, Little Compton, Rhode Island 

1942 Dr. Willi.\m A. Dayton, Washington, D. C. 

1942 A. T. De La Mare, New York, New York 

1942 David Fairchild, Coconut Grove, Florida 

1942 Joseph B. Gable, Stewartsto^Ti, Pennsylvania 

1942 Arthur Herringtox, Madison, New Jersey 

1942 Henry Hicks, Westbury, Long Island, New York 

1942 Fred H, Howard, Montebello, California 

1942 Colonel R. H. Montgomery, Coconut Grove, Florida 

1942 Robert Moses, New York, New York 

1942 G. G. Nearing, Ridgewood, New Jersey 

1942 Frederick Law Olmsted, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1942 Mrs. Elizabeth Peterson, New York, New York 

1942 George H. Pring, St. Louis, Missouri 

1942 Dr. Alfred Rehder, Jamaica Plain, Ma.ssachusetts 

1942 Dr. a. B. Stout, New York, New York 

1942 Norman Taylor, New York, New York 

1942 C. J. Van Bourgondien, Babylon, Long Island, New York 

1942 Richard Wellington, Geneva, New York 

1942 Elizabeth C. White, Whitesbog, New Jersey 

1943 Albert C. Burrage, Ips\\ich, Massachusetts 
1943 Vincent DePetris, Grosse Farms, Michigan 

1943 Edward I. Farrington, Weymouth, Massachusetts 

1943 Jens Jensen, Ellison Bay, Wisconsin 

1943 Henry T. Skinner, Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania 

1944 E. O. Orpet, Santa Barbara, California 

1944 Wilfrid Wheeler, Hatchville, Falmouth, Massachusetts 

1944 Richardson Wright, New York, New York 

1945 Joseph H. Hill, Richmond, Indiana 

1945 Albert Hulley, Middleboro, Massachusetts 

1945 Jacob K. Shaw, Amherst, Massachusetts 

1945 Theodore Wirth, Minneapolis, Minnesota 

1946 Walter B. Clarke, San Jose, CaUfomia 

1946 Mrs. John H. Cunningham, Brookline, Massachusetts 

1946 Daniel W. O'Brien, Boston, Massachusetts 

1946 Edmund F. Palmer, Vineland Station, Ontario, Canada 

1947 Dr. a. F. Blakeslee, Northampton, Massachusetts 

1947 Thomas H. E\'erett, New York Botanical Garden, New York 

1947 James J. Hurley, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

1947 Dr. Elmer Drew Merrill, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

1947 Isabella Preston, Lancaster, England 

1948 Ernest Borowski, Norwood, Massachusetts 
1948 Stedman Buttrick, Concord, Massachusetts 
1948 Ernest F. Coe, Coconut Grove, Florida 
1948 John L. Russell, Dedham, Massachusetts 

1948 Eric Walther, San Francisco, CaUfomia 

1949 Morris Carter, Boston, Massachusetts 
1949 Henry Kohankie, Painesville, Ohio 

1949 George H. Palmer, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

1949 A. Kenneth Simpson, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

1949 Harold B. Tukey, East Lansing, Michigan 

56 



I 



Bequests to the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society 



T IS hoped by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society that it 
will not be forgotten by members who find it expedient to make 
their wills. This Society's financial condition is sound and its 
investments are good, but the income from many of its investments 
has declined because of decreased returns from its bond holdings. 
Expenses naturally have increased and more money is needed to 
extend the activities of the Society. 

The following form of bequest is suggested: 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



I give and bequeath to the ^Massachusetts Horticul- 
tural Society located in Boston, Massachusetts, the sum 

of to be used as the Board of Trustees 

may direct for the promotion of horticulture in its various 
forms and for extending the activities of the Society along 
educational lines. 

Signed 





mh^''^ 



^CT 4 V9bO 






YEARBOOK 
1930 

MASSACHUSETTS 
HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

PRICE ONE DOLLAR 






1950 

FLOWER SHOWS 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
IN HORTICULTURAL HALL 

tIAIVIJARY 19 and 20 

Camellia Show 

MARCH 12 to 1» 

Spring Flower Show 
(^Mechanics Building) 

MAY 1 and 2 

Daffodil Show 

MAY 24 and 25 

Tulip Show 

JUNE 15 and 16 

Peonies^ Iris and Roses 

AUGUST 17 and IS 

Gladiolus Show 

AUGUST 23 and 24 

Exhibition of the Products 
of Children's Gardens 

OCTOBER 11, 12 and 13 

Harvest Show 

BTOVEMBER 2 to 5 

Autumn Flower Show 

DATES SUBJECT TO CHANGE 



1950 

YEARBOOK 

of the 



MASSACHUSETTS 
HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

Annual Reports 
for 1949 

and a List of Books added to the Library 



^ 



FOREWORD • The Committee on Lectures and Publications has the 
honor to present herewith the 27th number of the Society's Yearbook, 
with which are combined the annual reports for the year 1949. 



Boston, Massachusetts, July 1, 1950 R. A. Van Meter, Chairman 




ERNEST BOROWSKI 

Elected a Trustee, May 1, 1950 



CONTENTS 

Board of Government 5 

Committees of the Society 7 

Medals and Certificates Awarded in 1949 9 

Edwin S. Webster 17 

Special Medal Awards 18 

Garden Committee Awards 21 

Reports of Officers and Committees 

President's Address 27 

Report of the Secretary 29 

Report of Exhibitions Committee 32 

Report on Children's Gardens 36 

Report of Prize Committee 37 

Report of the Library Committee 38 

Report of the Treasurer 40 

Result of the Balloting 42 

Books Added to the Library 43 

Library's New Classification 49 

Benevolent Fruit and Flower Mission 53 

Necrology 54 

Honorary Members 56 

Bequests to the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 57 

3 




The Old Mill— New England Spring Flower Show 1950 

By Sherman W. Eddy 



THE BOARD OF GOVERNMENT 

OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY 

President 
JOHN S. AMES 



Vice-Presidents 

AUBREY B. BUTLER 
DR. GEORGE O. CLARK 



Trustees 
*John S. Ames Walter Hunnewell (1951) 

Ernest Borowski (1953) Seth L. Kelsey (1951) 

*Aubrey B. Butler Ray M. Keen (1953) 

George W. Butterworth (1952) George Lewis, Jr. (1952) 

*Stedman Buttrick Elmer D.Merrill (1953) 

George B. Cabot (1951) Mrs. William A. Parker (1951) 

*Dr. George O. Clark Harold S. Ross (1953) 

Mrs. John Gardner Coolidge (1952) R. A. Van Meter (1952) 

Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby (1953) Mrs. Roger S. Warner (1951) 

Oliver Wolcott (1952) 

Treasurer 
STEDMAN BUTTRICK 

Assistant Treasurer 
GEORGE LEWIS, JR. 

Secretary 
ARNO H. NEHRLING 

* Members ex-officio. Dates are those of expiration terms. 

5 






f%,^j^r^ 






■C^i 






^'^'f^w>^n-^'^'% 



* H* -^^'^H? ., 






-MJ' 






Tulip Garden— 1950 Spring Flower Show 

By Brack's of Boston 
6 



COMMITTEES OF THE SOCIETY 

For the Year Ending May 7, 7957 



AUBREY B. BUTLER 



STEDMAN BUHRICK 



AUBREY B. BUTLER 
STEDMAN BUHRICK 



GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH 



GEORGE W. BUTTERWORTH 
RAY M. KOON 



EDMUND MEZnr 



MRS. S. V. R. CROSBY 
GEORGE LEWIS, JR. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 

DR. GEORGE O. CLARK 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 

BUDGET COMMITTEE 
JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 



MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE 
RAY M. KOON, Chairman 

COMA4/rT£f ON EXHIBITIONS 

DR. ELMER D. MERRILL, Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON PRIZES 
ERNEST BOROWSKI, Chairman 
THOMAS MILNE, Co-Chairman 

JAMES METHVEN 

COMMITTEE ON UBRARY 
DR. ELMER D. MERRILL, Chairman 



STEDMAN BUHRICK 



WALTER HUNNEWELL 



DR. GEORGE O. CLARK 
WALTER HUNNEWELL 



AUBREY B. BUTLER 



MRS. WILLIAM A. PARKER 
HAROLD D. STEVENSON 



WALTER HUNNEWELL 



MRS. SUSAN McKELVEY 
MRS. ROGER S. WARNER 



COMMITTEE ON LECTURES AND PUBLICATIONS 

DR. R. A. VAN METER, Chairman 
ERNEST HOFTYZER 



GEORGE B. CABOT 



ERNEST BOROWSKI 
SETH L KELSEY 



RAY M. KOON 



COMMITTEE ON SPECIAL MEDALS 

HAROLD S. ROSS, Chairman 



MRS. JOHN G. COOLIDGE 
ALEXANDER I. HEIMLICH 



GEORGE W. BUHERWORTH 



COMMITTEE ON GARDENS 
SETH L KELSEY, Chairman 

COMMITTEE ON BUILDING 
JOHN S. AMES, Chairman 



DR. R. A. VAN METER 
DR. ELMER D. MERRILL 



GEORGE LEWIS, JR. 
OLIVER WOLCOn 



STEDMAN BUHRICK 



COMMITTEE ON CHILDREN'S GARDENS EXHIBITIONS 

MRS. ROGER S. WARNER, aairman 
DANIEL W. O'BRIEN MRS. HENRY D. TUDOR 

COMMITTEE ON THE ALBERT C. BURRAGE GOLD VASE 
HAROLD S. ROSS, Chairman 
ERNEST BOROWSKI 
ALBERT C. BURRAGE, JR. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 
GEORGE W. BUHERWORTH 
MRS. JOHN G. COOLIDGE 

DR. R. A. VAN METER 



GEORGE B. CABOT 
DR. ELMER D. MERRILL 

GEORGE LEWIS, JR. 
OUVER WOLCOn 




WUiiams 



DR. WILSON POPENOE, Tegucigalpa, Honduras 

Awarded George Robert White Medal of Honor 



8 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES AWARDED IN 1949 

The Albert C. Burrage Gold Vase 

Harlan P. Kelsey, Inc., East Boxford, for the most outstanding exhibit in 1949. 

George Robert White Medal of Honor 

Dr. Wilson Popenoe, Director Escuela Agricola Panamericana, Tegucigalpa, 
Honduras, for eminent service in horticulture. 

Thomas Roland Medal 

Montague Free, Staff Horticulturist of "The Home Garden," New York City, 
for skill in horticulture. 

Jackson Dawson Memorial Medals 

George L. Slate, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, for his work 

in the hybridization and propagation of small fruits. 
Richard Wellington, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, for his 

skill in the hybridization of apples, grapes and other small fruits. 

H. H. Hunnewell Medal 

Dr. George 0. Clark, for his estate at Newburyport. 

Gold Medals of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Kenneth Post, Ithaca, New York, for his book, "Florist Crop Production and 

Marketing." 
Mrs. Charles Griswold, Stockbridge, for a hillside estate of exceptional merit. 
Mrs. George O. Forbes, South Egremont, for a charming small estate. 

Silver Medal of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

Mrs. Bernard Hoffman, Stockbridge, for an unusual, attractive small garden. 

Garden Certificates of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 

The Heald Company, Worcester, for the foundation planting and the arrange 

ment of the plant material around the factory. 
The Norton Company, Worcester, for the colorful planting and the arrangement 

of the plant material around the factory. 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society Scroll 

Haydn S. Pearson, Waban, in recognition of his inspiring writings in books, maga- 
zines and newspaper editorials pertaining to agriculture and horticulture. 

President's Cup 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stone, Marion, for two groups of acacias at the Spring 
Show. 

Gold Medal of the Horticultural Society of New York 

Harlan P. Kelsey, Inc., East Boxford, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

Gold Medal Certificate of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society 

Edwin S. Webster, Chestnut Hill, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 

9 




Old Apothecary's Shop at 1950 Spring Flower Show 

By Frost and Higgins Company 



10 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES— Confinued 11 

George Holliday Memorial Prize 

George Finnie, Dublin, New Hampshire, for a group of cinerarias at the Spring 
Show. 

Beacon Hill Garden Club Cup 

Buzzards Bay Garden Club, for the garden of Peter Rabbit at the Spring Show. 

Mrs. John S. Ames Cup 

North Shore Garden Club, for a Chinese tea merchant's garden at the Spring 
Show. 

The Antoine Leuthy Gold Medal 

Edwin S. Webster, Chestnut Hill, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 

Trophy of the Massachusetts Department of Agriculture 

Bay State Nurseries, Inc., North Abington, for a preview of a Spring garden and a 
Fall garden at the Spring Show. 

Sarah Todd Bulkley Medal of the Garden Club of America 

Massachusetts Horticultural Society and the cooperating exhibitors for a realistic 
impression of a jungle landscape at the Spring Show. 

Book: "Taylor's Encyclopedia of Gardening" edited by Norman Taylor. 

C. K. Cummings, Prides Crossing, for camellia Alba Plena, best bloom in the Show. 

Crystal Vases 

Harold S. Ross, Hingham, for the breeder tulip Chinese Bandit, best bloom in 

the Show. 
Kenneth D. Smith, Staten Island, N. Y., for daffodil Bryher, best bloom in the 

Show. 

New England Gladiolus Society SOth Anniversary Prize 

An illuminated scroll awarded by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society to 
Marcellus W. Hitchcock, Schoharie, N. Y., for gladiolus variety Parthiena. 

Gold Medals 

Bartlett Gardens, for a formal garden at the Spring Show. 

Bay State Nurseries, Inc., for a preview of a Spring garden and Fall garden at the 
Spring Show. 

Boston School of Flower Arrangement, Mrs. Arthur P. Teele, Director, for holi- 
day decorations. 

Breck's, for a display of chrysanthemums. 

Breck's, for a display of daffodils. 

Breck's, for a Spring garden at the Spring Show. 

Breck's, for a display of tulips. 

Butterworth's, for a display of cymbidiums at the Spring Show. 

Champlain View Gardens, Burlington, Vermont, for a display of gladiolus. 

Cherry Hill Nurseries, for a display of peonies. 

The Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts (Mrs. Chester Cook, chairman) 
for flower arrangements at the Spring Show. 

Garden-in-the- Woods (Will C. Curtis), for flowering and foliage plants at the 
Spring Show. 

Alexander Irving Heimlich, for a ledge garden at the Spring Show. 

Albert A. Hulley, for a rose garden at the Spring Show. 




Stone Cottage at the 1950 Spring Flower Show 
By Boy State NurserieSi he 



12 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES-Confinued 13 

Harlan P. Kelsey, Inc. (Kelsey-Highlands Nursery, Inc.), for an informal garden 

at the Spring Show. 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society Women's Exhibitions Committee (Miss 

Mary May Binney, chairman), for small hedged gardens at the Spring Show. 
Orchidvale, for a group of orchids. 
Richard C. Paine, for a specimen nerine plant. 

Mrs. Robert Treat Paine, 2nd, for a group of cymbidiums at the Spring Show 
Ralph Ristaino, for a display of Concord grapes. 
Don Roehrs, East Rutherford, New Jersey (at New York), for the best garden in 

the Show. 
Harold S. Ross, for a display of tulips. 
Miss Eleonora Sears, for a group of chrysanthemums. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert 0. Stone, for two groups of acacias at the Spring Show. 
William T. Walke & Sons, Inc., for a group of amaryllis at the Spring Show. 
Edwin S. Webster, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids at the Spring Show. 
Weston Nurseries, Inc., for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 

Silver Medals 

Robert Borowski, for a group of seedling chrysanthemums. 

Boston School Garden, Woburn, for the largest and best display of vegetables and 

flowers from a school garden. 
Mrs. E. D. Brandegee, for a group of chrysanthemums. 
Mrs. F. F. Brewster, Dublin, New Hampshire, for a group of cinerarias at the 

Spring Show. 
Brightridge Greenhouses, for a rose garden of climbing and hybrid tea roses at 

the Spring Show. 
Butler & Ullman, Inc., for a display of camellias at the Spring Show. 
Butterworth's, for a display of orchids at the Spring Show. 
F. I. Carter & Sons, for a garden of cacti and succulents at the Spring Show. 
F. I. Carter & Sons, for a display of saintpaulias at the Spring Show. 
Cherry Hill Nurseries, for an informal garden at the Spring Show. 
Sherman Eddy, Avon, Connecticut, for a lighthouse keeper's garden at the Spring 

Show. 
Mrs. Guernsey L. Frost and Mrs. Harold McMurtry, for a display of pansies at 

the Spring Show. 
Gardner Museum, for oleander and bougainvillea specimens. 
Francis W. Hunnewell, for a group of Coelogyne cristata at the Spring Show. 
Edgar L. Kline, Lake Grove, Oregon (at Fairfax, Virginia), for a collection of 

lilies. 
Dunbar Lockwood, for a group of cymbidiums at the Spring Show. 
C. H. Lothrop, for an exhibit of double snapdragons at the Spring Show. 
The Merry's, for a display of daffodils. 
Middlesex County Beekeepers Association, for a beekeeping exhibit at the Spring 

Show. 
New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, for a collection of seedling 

grapes. 
Miss Elynor O'Neil, for a demonstration of the use of roses in the home, at the 

Spring Show. 
Richard C. Paine, for English hybrid begonias. 
Richard C. Paine, for an exhibit of chrysanthemums. 
Mrs. Morris A. Parris, Marshall, Virginia (at Fairfax, Virginia), for the lily 

Brocade. 
Peirce Bros., Inc., for a display of roses at the Spring Show. 
John Truesdale, for a display of tulips. 
George H. Walker, for a collection of gourds. 
Watson Camellia Gardens, Inc., for a display of camellias and camellia wedding 

arrangements. * 

Edwin S. Webster, for bush and standard fuchsia plants. 
Edwin S. Webster, for a group of orchids. 
Winter Gardeners, for a model greenhouse at the Spring Show. 



14 MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES— Continued 

Bronze Medals 

F. I. Carter & Sons, for a group of saintpauliaB. 

Conard-Pyle Company, West Grove, Pennsylvania, for the world's smallest roses 

at the Spring Show. 
Richard C. Paine, for an exhibit of dahlias. 

First Class Certificates 

Chrysanthemum Mrs. Dewey, exhibited by Cummings The Florist. 
Chrysanthemum Improved Indianapolis White, exhibited by Cummings The 

Florist. 
New English chrysanthemum Balcombe Perfection, exhibited by Totty's. 
Cymbidium Swallow, Webster's var., exhibited by Edwin S. Webster (award of 

the American Orchid Society). 
Gladiolus White Satin, exhibited by Arthur Koemer. 
Gladiolus Winter Carnival, exhibited by Arthur Koemer. 
Rose Raving Beauty, exhibited by Joseph H. Hill Company. 

Awards of Merit 

Brassolaeliocattleya Midinette, exhibited by Edwin S. Webster. 
Brassolaeliocattleya Dawn Angela, Webster's var., exhibited by Edwin S. Webster 

(award of the American Orchid Society). 
New English chrysanthemum Daintiness, exhibited by Totty's. 
New English chrysanthemum Salmon Pink, exhibited by Totty's. 
New English chrysanthemum Say Edgar, exhibited by Totty's. 
Daffodil Bryher, exhibited by Kenneth D. Smith. 
Delphinium chinense Blue Mirror, exhibited by Harold S. Ross. 
Geranium Annette, exhibited by Robert Borowski. 
Gladiolus Bright Eyes, exhibited by Arthur Koemer. 
Gladiolus Piccolo, exhibited by Arthur Koemer. 
Gladiolus Tiny Yellow, exhibited by Arthur Koemer. 
MaliLS Katherine, exhibited by the Arnold Arboretum. 

Votes of Commendation 

Actinidia, exhibited by the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station. 
New crimson, wine and pink types of fancy leaved caladiums, exhibited by Wynd- 

ham Hayward. 
Geranium Dorothy, exhibited by Robert Borowski. 
Peony A. H. Fewkes, exhibited by Cherry Hill Nurseries. 
Peony Amberglow, exhibited by Cherry Hill Nurseries. 
Native persinmions, exhibited by New York State Agricultural Experiment 

Station. 

Cultural Certificates 

Peter Arnott, for a group of chrysanthemums. 

Peter Arnott, for calanthe Baron Schroeder (award of the American Orchid 

Society). 
Peter Arnott, for dendrobium Louis Bleriot. 
George N. Barrie, for a display of odontoglossums. 
Birchville Gardens, for a display of gladiolus. 
Breck's, for a display of daffodils. 
Henry J. Buhle, for an exhibit of peaches. 
Butterworth's, for CyrnJbidium alexanderi. 
F. I. Carter & Sons, for a display of saintpaulias. 
Max Cohen, for a group of cattlej'^as. 
Albert A. Hulley, tor clematis and roses. 
Francis W. Hunnewell, for Coelogyne cristata (award of the American Orchid 

Society). 
James J. Hurley, for a group of nerines. 



MEDALS AND CERTIFICATES— Conf/nuec/ 



15 



James J. Hurley, for cymbidiums (award of the American Orchid Society). 

A. C. Sodano, for rose Raving Beauty. 

John F. Sullivan, for Pelargonium domesiicum Apple Blossom. 

Trombla Bros., for chrysanthemum Bronze Frieda. 

Trombla Bros., for chjysanthemum Illini Glory. 

Mrs. Sydney M. Williams, for Adiantum cuneatum (maidenhair fern). 

Vote of Thanks 

Arnold Arboretum, for flowering crab apples. 

Bay State Nurseries, Inc., for seedling chrysanthemums 

Mrs. J. K. Billingsley, for an arrangement of dahlias. 

Mrs. Charles E. Cotting, for Ruellia macoyana specimens, 

Flint's Greenhouses, for snapdragons. 

George H. Meloon, Inc., for carnation Tom Knipe, 

Mrs. R. Boyer Miller, for three baskets of dahlias. 

New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, for seedling apples and new 

raspberries. 
Miss E. Philbrick, for Leucojum vemum Snowflake. 
Miss E. Philbrick, for a vase of climbing roses. 
Heinrich Rohrbach, for Apricot Star chrysanthemums. 
Heinrich Rohrbach, for golden, yellow and pink dwarf dahlias. 
Mrs. H. A. Sheehan, for a bowl of cut tuberous begonia flowers. 
Mrs. Roger Stone, for an exhibit of flowering shrubs. 
University of Massachusetts, Department of Pomology, for a display of apple 

varieties. 
Waltham Field Station, for a display of perennials. 




New England Farmhouse at 1950 Spring Flower Show 

By Harlan P. Kelsey, Inc. 




EDWrN S. WEBSTER 
16 



Edwin S. Webster 

Edwin S. Webster, who passed away May 10 at his home in the Chestnut 
Hill suburb of Boston, enjoyed an international reputation as a distinguished 
engineer, business man and financier. To the 13,500 members of the Massa- 
chusetts Horticultural Society and to other thousands throughout the coun- 
try, he will be remembered as a Ufe-long leader in the field of horticulture, a 
famed collector of orchids and an enthusiastic supporter of flower shows for 
the pleasure and benefit of the pubUc. 

As president of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society for 13 years, he 
saw that institution grow from one with a Hmited and local membership to 
one which embraced the entire country. He gave his warm support to the 
activities of the American Orchid Society and to other organizations promot- 
ing horticultural advancement in America. His interest in roses led to the 
development of a rose garden numbered among the best in New England. 

Mr. Webster's knowledge of orchids was wide and his greenhouse was 
filled with choice specimens, which he dehghted to display for the enjoyment 
of all flower lovers at the smaller shows in Horticultural Hall, Boston, as well 
as at the great Spring exhibitions. He and Mrs. Webster often opened their 
lovely gardens for charity. His interest in these gardens and in all horticul- 
tural activities continued to the very end of a Ufe which rounded out 82 very 
full and active years. His passing leaves a blank in the horticultural world 
as well as in many other fields of endeavor. 



U 



SPECIAL MEDAL AWARDS 

The Board of Trustees have awarded the joUovnng medals, on the recommenda- 
tion of the Special Medals Committee, Harold S. Ross, chairman. 

The GEORGE ROBERT WHITE MEDAL OF HONOR for semce to 
horticulture: to Dr. Wilson Popenoe, Director, Escuela Agricola Panameri- 
cana, Honduras. Dr. Popenoe is one of the most prominent figures of the day 
in the field of tropical agriculture. His career has been both long and varied. 
He began his work in California where he distinguished himself while still a 
young man both in the culture of the avocado and of the date palm. He began 
his work in a wider field with his appointment as Agricultural Explorer for 
the Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction in the Bureau of Plant 
Industry, United States Department of Agriculture. Here he was very active 
for 12 years. His work was particularly outstanding in Latin America where 
he received many honors from the Latin American countries. His famiUarity 
with the problems of agriculture in Latin America led him to establish the 
Division of Agricultural Cooperation in the Pan American Union. His work 
became so important that in 1925 he joined the staff of the United Fruit 
Company and moved to Tela, Honduras, where it was proposed to bring 
together an extensive collection of tropical economic plants. Thus was bom 
Lancetilla Experiment Station, today one of the best collections of such 
plants in the Americas. In particular he was successful in the development of 
banana culture in the Central American countries. In the mid thirties and 
subsequently, he became interested in Cinchona products and during the 
World War he was active in procuring, for the armed forces, a supply of 
anti-malarial drugs. In 1941, on the establishment of the Escuela Agricola Pan- 
americana, he was appointed director of the institution. Since that time he 
has continued to demonstrate the greatness of leadership and scholarship 
which is his. 

The THO^L\S ROLAXD 
MEDAL for skill m horticul- 
ture: to Montague Free, for- 
merly horticulturist at the 
Brooklyn Botanic Garden and 
now one of the editors of 
"Home Garden" magazine. 
Mr. Free, in addition to being 
an outstanding horticulturist, 
has for many years been dis- 
tinguished as a brilliant writer 
and lecturer on horticultural 
and gardening subjects. His 
book "Gardening" is consid- 
ered to be one of the out- 
standing as well as the most 
complete guides for gardeners 
published in the English lan- 
guage. 




MONTAGUE FREE 



18 




PROFESSOR GEORGE SLATE 

The JACKSON DAWSON MEDAL 

for skill in hybridization and propaga- 
tion of hardy, woody plants: to Pro- 
fessor Richard Wellington and Professor 
George Slate, both of the New York 
Agricultural Experiment Station. It is 
unusual to make a double award of this 
medal but under the circumstances it 
was considered necessary to do so this 
year. The reason is that both these 
gentlemen have carried along programs 



Photo: Wesselmann 
PROFESSOR RICHARD WELLINGTON 

in the development of new fruits along 
approximately parallel lines. Agriculture 
of today would be distinctly poorer in 
such matters as apples, strawberries, rasp- 
berries, blackberries and grapes if it were 
not for the work these two men have 
already accomplished. Since both are 
now continuing their programs it is ex- 
pected that further contributions will 
be received from them to further enrich 
horticulture. 



The Society's SCROLL: to Haydn S. 
Pearson for his writing which has ap- 
peared in such newspapers as the 
"Boston Herald". Mr. Pearson is par- 
ticularly well-known for his most in- 
teresting editorials pertaining to nature 
study and to the relationship between 
modem civilization and the woods and 
fields. These editorials appearing as 
they do on the same page with edi- 
torials on politics, atom bombs, crime, 
divorce and similarly distressing sub- 
jects, are most refreshing and stimu- 
lating. Mr. Pearson has also written 
several books which are read with 
pleasure by those interested in his 
subject matter. 




Photo: V amine 



HAYDN S. PEARSON 



The Society's GOLD 
:MEDAL: to Dr. Kenneth 
Post of Cornell University for 
liis book "Florist Crop Pro- 
duction and Marketing". This 
book is both significant and 
substantial and it is an out^ 
standing contribution to the 
hterature of floriculture, plant 
production and distribution. 
Dr. Post is also an accom- 
plished horticulturist and re- 
search scientist as well as 
being the author of other books 
and articles in his field. 

DR. KENNETH POST 





Photo: Prentiss French 



The Stockbridge Garden of Mrs. Charles Griswold 
Gold Medal 



Garden Committee Awards 

The Board of Trustees awarded the following medals and certificates on the 
recommendation of the Committee on Gardens, Seth L. Kelsey, chairman. 

The H. H. Hunnewell Medal: 

To Dr. George O. Clark, "Chailey'' Newburyport, for a country estate of 
unusual interest, where horticultural skill has been combined with excep- 
tional good taste in the development of a fine location overlooking the Merri- 
mac River. Fine native trees, rare and beautiful evergreens, flowering trees, 
shrubs, flowers and groundcover plants are features of the landscape. Ex- 
periments with many different kinds of plants such as Lihes, Rhododendrons, 
Azaleas, Clematis, Blueberries, etc., are contributing to horticultural knowl- 
edge as well as giving special interest to different areas. 

The Society's Gold Medal: 

To Mrs. George O. Forbes, "Orchard Farm" South Egremont, for an 
unusually lovely small estate where house and garden blend to form a pattern 
for gracious country living. A rear outdoor hving room or terrace, planted 
with skillful restraint, leads to a series of different levels, each presenting a 
different picture, and finally to a wooded hillside where wild flowers and ferns 
are featured. 

The Society's Gold Medal: 

To Mrs. Charles Griswold, Prospect Hill, Stockbridge, for a hillside estate 
of exceptional merit. Skillful terracing and fine use of plant material invite 
outdoor U^dng. Interesting details of planting are many, all are coordinated to 
make the over-all effect unusually appeahng. Especially commended is the 
restraint of planting in areas where emphasis on form or color would detract 
from the magnificent views of the valley below. 

The Society's Silver Medal: 

To Mrs. Bernard Hoffman, Stockbridge, for a small garden combining 
variety of interest with ease of maintenance. Carefully pruned apple trees, a 
wandering flower-bordered brook and a hedge-enclosed herb garden are fea- 
tures of this deHghtful home, where good taste in planting detail combines 
with simpUcity of design to create an effect of unusual attractiveness. 

The Society's Garden Certificate: 

To the Heald Company, Roger N. Heald, Pres., Worcester, for a dignified 
and practical foundation planting that might well serve as a model for other 
commercial enterprises. The choice and arrangement of plant material is 
unusually felicitous. 

21 




Part of the Garden of Mrs. Bernard Hoffman, Stockbridge 

Silver Medal 
22 



GARDEN COMMITTEE AWARDS 



23 



The Society's Garden Certificate: 

To The Norton Company, Milton P. Higgins, Pres., Worcester, for the 
planting of an inner courtyard. The pool, paths and flower beds are well- 
designed and maintained; the whole effect is colorful and most refreshing in 
surroundings of industrial acti\4ty. 

Your committee was gratified that its trip to the western part of the state 
was so productive in the number and quahty of gardens \'iewed. It is hoped 
that another year the central part of the state may prove equally productive, 
and it is reconunended the advance scouting which was so helpful this year be 
carried on in that area and in the Cape Cod region which should have the 
Coimnittee's attention this coming season. 

The Committee also feels that some of its \isits this year were not made 
at the best season, and recommends to its successor that a real effort be made 
to \'isit each area at the season when the gardens may be expected to be at 
their best. Preliminary consultation with the owners will assist toward this 
end. 




The South Egremont Garden of Mrs. George O. Forbes 

Gold Medal 



24 



SPECIAL MEDAL AWARDS 




The Garden of the estate of Dr. George O. Clark at Newburyport 

Awarded the H. H. Hunnewell Medal 



Right, above: Heald Company, Worcester 

Society's Garden Certificate 

Right, below: Norton Company, Worcester 

Society's Garden Certificate 




X ' 





A typical flower arrangement at the 1950 Spring Flower Show 
Arrangements staged by the Garden Club Federation of Massachusetts 

26 



ANNUAL MEETING 27 

Reports of Officers and Committees 

Presented at the 

ANNUAL MEETING, MAY 1, 1950 

The annual meeting of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society was held at 
Horticultural Hall, Boston, on May 1, 1950, at 3:00 P.M., with the President, 
Mr. John S. Ames, in the chair. He appointed as tellers Mr. George Taloumis, 
Miss Mary Kelly, Miss Claire Sabadini and Miss Ann White. 

Mr. Arno H. Nehrling, the Executive Secretary, read the call for the meet- 
ing. By vote the reading of the minutes of the previous annual meeting was 
waived. The following addresses and reports were read: 



The President's Address 

As President of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society I am delighted to 
report that once again our organization has enjoyed a very successful year. 
This is particularly pleasing in view of the fact that this Meeting marks the 
50th Anniversary of our occupation of the present Horticultural Hall. This 
building was completed in 1900 and we have occupied it continuously ever 
since. It is the third in a series of buildings which this Society has owned, 
each change necessary because of our constant advancement. 

This growth is reflected in our membership. At the present time we have 
13,290 members. This is an increase of more than 1,000 over last year and it 
is the largest membership that this Society has ever had. This increase in 
membership I am most delighted to point out is not artificial. We could easily 
multiply our membership several times if we cared to undertake an active 
membership campaign. However, we prefer to have the membership grow 
naturally. We have members in practically every state and in a number of 
foreign countries. We do plan to continue our membership development in 
an orderly and natural manner to the end that we will always have a large, 
loyal and interested group of men and women — people who are actually 
interested in horticulture and in this Society. 

As is to be expected, our increased membership has necessitated the em- 
ployment of additional staff members. We now have the largest staff in our 
history. You will understand that an increased staff has been found necessary 
to care adequately for our many activities and also for the increase in service 
which members are more and more requesting. 

During the past year we have continued the work of bringing our building 
up to standard. Ever since the War concluded we have carried along a program 
of repair made necessary by conditions during the War years. I am happy to 
say that the inside of the building is now in first class shape. TMs is not 
true of the exterior and some time in the near future the walls will have to 
be pointed. 



28 ANNUAL MEETING 

Another project carried along during the past year was the cleaning and 
repairing of the portraits in the Presidents' Gallery. For the past three years 
we have annually had ten of these portraits restored. This year we hope to 
have ten more cared for and this will complete the restoration of our portraits. 
This is a possession of which we are very proud. 

In subsequent reports you will hear detailed accounts of our various ac- 
tivities. However, I should like to mention our lecture series. During the 
Winter months we had lectures by John Xash Ott, Jr., Jesse H. Buffum, 
Milford W. Wall and George S. Coffin. This series was very well attended. 
This Spring we are conducting a series of garden lectures. The speakers are 
Prof. Paul Dempse}^ Miss Brenda Xewton, Daniel J. Foley, Prof. A. F. 
Yeager and Prof. W. D. Whitcomb. This series, which concludes May 25, 
promises to be very successful. 

Our publication program continues with our magazine Horticulture en- 
joying continued growth both in circulation and in popularity. It has been 
praised as one of the outstanding gardening magazines of the countr>\ I may 
say that we are very proud to have our magazine selected for permanent 
recording by the University Microfilms, Ann Arbor, Mich. This honor came 
to us without solicitation and it is being carried along without expense to us. 
Our magazine also was awarded a Silver Medal by the National Garden 
Institute for conspicuous service to gardening in America. This medal is 
the highest award which the Institute can give. In addition to the magazine 
we publish other material. This year we have had two books published. The 
"Plant Buyers Guide", a complete and authoritative listing of the plant 
material available in this countrj^ is the only book of its kind in existence 
and we felt that we were doing horticulture a distinct service in bringing 
out this edition. A new edition of Mr. E. I. Farrington's "Travel Book" was 
pubhshed during the year and it is meeting with the expected popularity. 
The Library' has also published a re\ised Book List. 

One of our most conspicuous new acti\'ities is Garden Week in ]Massa- 
chusetts. This was an experiment a year ago and developed beyond our ex- 
pectations to such a degree that the Trustees voted to continue it. This j^ear 
Garden Week is being held May 21-27 and it is already attracting national 
attention. There are 52 houses and gardens in eastern Massachusetts from 
North Easton to Newburj^Dort on a carefully prepared schedule. Miss ^lary 
May Binney, a member of this Society, is Chairman in charge of Garden 
Week. She has given practically all her time to this project. No committee 
chairman has ever worked more unselfishly or more devotedly than she. 

Our Flower Shows continue to be another of our most important activities. 
It is enough for me to say here that we enjoyed a most successful season, as 
you will hear in a detailed report to come a httle later. 

Our Library has continued to grow and adequately meets its position as 
one of the greatest horticultural Hbraries in the world. The Library Com- 
mittee report will acquaint you with the details of its operation. 

I may say that our financial situation continues to be favorable as our 
Treasurer, Mr. Stedman Buttrick, will shortly report. 

I wish to take this occasion to thank the members of the Board of Trustees, 
the members of the various committees and the members of the staff who 
have assisted me and the other officers who carry on our work at Horticultural 



ANNUAL MEETING 29 

Hall. We have a very loyal and devoted organization and I am sure I express 
the opinion of you all when I say that we are fortunate indeed. 

In summary I may say very briefly that we are in an excellent position 
not only financially but in respect to our accomplishments and reputation. 
We are the largest horticultural organization in the United States. We have 
a long record of distinguished ser\dce to horticulture and I am sure that in 
the years ahead we may confidently expect a continued growth in our mem- 
bership and a constant development of our faciUties of service to members 
and to the public and, in short we hope to remain the outstanding organization 
of our kind in America. 

John S. Ames 
President 



Report of the Secretary 

As Mr. Ames has just reported, we have had a very successful year — 
particularly in our membership growth. I should like to add that our present 
total of more than 13,000 and our expectations of continued growth bring 
up an important point. We can properly serve only about 15,000 members 
with our present facilities and equipment. Membership above this point will 
necessitate new equipment and additional personnel. 

Our subscription list to Horticulture, due to our constant efforts, con- 
tinues to increase. Mr. William H. Clark, our editor, leaves no stone unturned 
to give our subscribers the most interesting, accurate and authentic horticul- 
tural information available. Many of the contributors are specialists in their 
respective fields. 

Due to the increased membership and circulation of our magazine Horti- 
culture, requests for information are increasing daily. Mr. George Taloumis, 
our associate editor, and other members of the staff spend many hours each 
week answering letters which come from all sections of the United States. 
As time has allowed the members of the staff have again given lectures and 
demonstrations on gardening to various groups in different parts of the 
State. 

The fifing and classifying of the cuts used in our magazine Horticulture, 
an important office detail, was necessarily neglected for a number of years. 
The files also contained a good many cuts ready for the discard as they are 
outdated. Mr. Farrington was kind enough to assist us with this work and 
I am happy to say that within a few weeks we will again have an up-to-date 
cut file. 

Garden Week in Massachusetts, our newest project, already mentioned by 
our President, developed beyond our expectations. As a result the Board 
voted to continue it. Miss Mary May Binney is again serving as chairman of 
the Garden Week Committee. She is giving practically all her time in an 
effort to make the event an outstanding success. 



3 ANNUAL MEETING 

The flower shows conducted by the Society will be given special attention 
by the Chainnan of the Committee on Exhibitions. However, since the flower 
shows are one of my major interests I am happy to report a successful year. 
We have never had a Spring show which received as many favorable com- 
ments as our recent Spring show. The theme ''Old Xew England'' made a 
deep impression on our show visitors. 

As President Ames reported in his address our building is now in excellent 
condition. We are especially proud of the large Exhibition Hall which re- 
ceived a fresh coat of paint last Summer. The color selected by the house 
committee — a pleasing shade of green — serves as a perfect background for 
all types of plant material. The past year we have had more meetings in 
Horticultural Hall than any time in our history. Our faciUties are often taxed 
to the point where we find it necesary to suggest changing dates for meetings 
of organizations. 

The Concord grape centennial, which we observed at the time of our 
Fall show, proved to be a very interesting event and attracted nation-wide 
attention. Mr. Wilfrid Wheeler, who was the first Commissioner of Agricul- 
ture in Massachusetts., was in charge of the formal program. As a former 
Concord neighbor he spoke at length on the life of Ephraim Bull. Professor 
Richard Wellington of the Xew York Agricultural Experiment Station, 
Geneva. Xew York, and Professor O. C. Roberts of the Universitj' of Massa- 
chusetts discussed grape culture and grape varieties. 

The activities of some of our Committees are not too well known — not 
even by our own members. I am thinking particularly of the Committee on 
Gardens. This Committee made an extended tour last Summer through the 
western part of the State and inspected many fine gardens. A number of 
these gardens were awarded gold and silver medals. A complete report of the 
awards will appear in the Yearbook. In Worcester, the Committee discovered 
a number of factories prop>erl5'" landscaped. Two of these concerns, the 
Xorton Company and the Heald Companj^ were accordingly awarded garden 
certificates. 

Another Committee that works quietly and effectively is the Committee 
on Special Medals. This Committee is entrusted with the responsibility of 
selecting candidates for the most important horticultural medals offered in 
this countn.-. The G^rge Robert White Medal of Honor — the highest award 
of the Societv- — was awarded to Dr. Wilson Popenoe, Director of Escuela 
Agricola Panamericana, in Honduras. Of special interest is the fact that the 
!Medal was presented in person bj" Dr. Elmer D. Merrill, one of the members 
of our Board of Trustees, who was a guest of the school at a special ceremony. 
In addition to the faculty and students of the school, many dignitaries from 
nearby Latin American countries were present. The event was wideh' pub- 
licized and undoubtedly wUl strengthen the friendly relationship that exists 
between this country and our Latin American neighbors. 

The Thomas Roland Medal, another important award, went to Mr. 
Montague Free, a well known horticulturist, lecturer and garden writer. 
The Committee established a precedent this j-ear when they awarded not one 
but two Jackson Dawson Medals. The medals were given to Professor Rich- 
ard Wellington and Professor George Slate, both of the Xew York Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station, Geneva. Xew York. They have been working 



ANNUAL MEETING 



31 



along parallel lines, with the hybridization and propagation of new varieties 
of small fruits. The results of their efforts have benefited the entire nation. 

The Committee also awarded a scroll to Mr. Haydn S. Pearson, who 
writes those marv^elous editorials on nature in the Boston Herald. Nothing 
is more stimulating than one of Mr. Pearson's editorials on the same page 
with editorials on politics, atom bombs and crime. 

The Committee on Publications and Lectures, a very important committee, 
also works quietly behind the scenes. Mr. Ernest Hoftyzer, who has had a 
great deal of experience in magazine and newspaper work, is the chairman. 
All the members of the committee have worked unselfishly to assist us with 
the many problems that arise in the publication of a national magazine. Mr. 
Ames has referred to our lectures. I would like to add that we have never 
had a more successful Winter series. ]\Ir. Jesse Buffum who spoke on the Fiji 
Islands, emphasizing the plant material, had to repeat his lecture the same 
afternoon and even though this was the case hundreds of people were turned 
away. 

When Mr. Milford Wall showed his famous pictures on the Canadian 
Rockies people came from all parts of New England and again we were not 
able to accommodate them all. It is gratifying to note that our Spring series 
is also breaking attendance records. To us this proves that there is an ever 
increasing interest in horticulture. 

On Friday of last week we 
received the sad news of the 
death of Prof. Oakes Ames, for 
many years a member of our 
Board of Trustees. Mr. Ames 
also served as a Vice President 
of the Society from 1928-1940, 
and as chairman of the Library 
Committee in 1939. In 1941 
he was made an honorary 
trustee. Before his retirement 
Prof. Ames was Professor of 
botany at Harvard Univer- 
sity, supervisor of the Arnold 
Arboretum and director of the 
botanical museum. Prof. Ames 
devoted his life to the study of 
orchid specimens which he col- 
lected all over the world. He 
presented his orchid herbarium 
consisting of 64,000 specimens 
and considered the largest col- 
lection in the world to Har- 
vard in 1941. 
Prof. Ames was also the 
author of many books and papers on orchids and economic botany. His 
work in the classification of orchids comprised seven volumes. During his 
long career he described more than 1,000 new species. 




Bachrach 



PROFESSOR OAKES AMES 



32 ANNUAL MEETING 

Prof. Ames received many honors in recognition of his work, including the 
degree of Doctor of Science, the George Robert White Medal of Honor for 
eminent service to horticulture from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society 
as well as the Centennial Medal of the Society and the Gold Medal of the 
American Orchid Society. 

We shall greatly miss his advice and counsel. 

It now becomes my sad duty to report the death of Mr. Ellis Joy, who 
served in the capacity of custodian of our building for nearly 27 years. Mr. 
Joy was a faithful and conscientious worker who will be greatly missed, 
especially by our flower show exhibitors who depended on him for much of the 
preliminary work in the staging of exhibits. 

In closing I would like to express my sincerest thanks for the splendid 
cooperation I have received from the officers and trustees, as well as the chair- 
men of the various committees. I would also hke to express my thanks to the 
members of the staff for their loyal support. I am looking forward to enjoying 
the same support and cooperation in the future. 

Arno H. Nehrling 
Executive Secretary 

Report of the Exhibitions Committee 

Again, I have the great pleasure of reporting another outstandingly suc- 
cessful year, successful from the standpoint of the various exhibitions, includ- 
ing the Spring Show, and successful also financially, the latter being par- 
ticularly important from the standpoint of the well-being of the Massachu- 
setts Horticultural Society. As a matter of fact, the profit from the Spring 
Show, which accrues wholly to the Society, not only exceeded the amount 
indicated by the Trustees as a requirement to meet budgetaiy needs for the 
current year, but was actually in excess of the profit from the show of the 
previous year. The successful year was largely due to the remarkably well 
developed spirit of cooperation between exhibitors and the Society, to the 
interest and ser\'ices of all members of the Exhibitions Committee, the close 
affiliations of exhibitors with the Committee through the management, the 
fine cooperation we have had from officials of the Society, and our relation- 
ships with the Prize Committee. As in past years all members of both Com- 
mittees are inmiediately apprised of the actions of each group. As a matter 
of fact, no joint meeting of the two committees was required during the year 
to smooth out differences of opinion between exhibitors and the Prize Com- 
mittee, evidence that in general the decisions of the latter committee have 
been satisfactory to exhibitors; this is a most important matter. Because the 
plans for the Spring Show were developed earfier than usual in 1949, fewer 
meetings of the Exhibitions Committee were required. Eight well attended 
sessions were held. 

Nine shows were staged, one less than in the preceding year. Again the 
records show that the attendance at the eight smaller shows, all of which were 
staged at Horticultural Hall, increased over that of the preceding year, 
while the attendance at the Spring Show was distinctly in excess of that of 
1949. The small shows, beginning in January with the CameUia display, and 
closing with the Autumn Flower Show in November, were, including the 
above two, the Daffodil, Tulip, Peony-Iris-Rose, Products of Children's 



ANNUAL MEETING 



33 




Section of the Rainbow Gardens at 1950 Spring Flower Show 

Staged by the Women's Exhibitions Committee 



34 ANNUAL MEETING 

Gardens, Gladiolus, and Harvest. All of these were free to the pubhc escept 
the Autumn Flower Show, but even this was free to members of the Society; 
an innovation at this show was the provision of a certain amount of trade 
space. Perhaps, partly as a result of this innovation, the cost of staging this, 
the second largest of our exhibitions, was reduced by about $1,000.00. It is, 
of course, to a very considerable degree, the continued financial success of 
the Annual Spring Shows that enables the Society not only to stage these 
eight smaller and, with one exception, free exliibitions, for the benefit of its 
members and the pubhc, but at the same time to render numerous other 
services to all who are interested in plants and in gardens. 

The Spring Show, March, 1950, was an outstanding success from all stand- 
points, variety and quaUty of the material exhibited, artistic arrangements of 
the various exhibits, attendance, and financial returns. The general theme 
of the exhibition was Old New England and the exhibition as a whole was 
fortunately one of those which advertised itself, a logical conclusion drawn 
from the fact that after the opening day the attendance increased in the latter 
days of the week as compared with the exhibition of 1949. The final results 
are shoTSTi in the increased attendance and in the larger financial returns as 
compared with the pre\"ious year. 

In Grand Hall all exhibits were correlated with the show theme Old New 
England. Such exhibits as those staged by the Kelsej'-Highlands, Cherrj'' Hill, 
and Bay State* Nurseries were of a practical nature gi\'ing ^i3itors an oppor- 
tunity to learn how home grounds may be improved without great expense. 
The fine exhibitions on the stage demonstrated clearly how two participants 
could and did so harmonize their displays that the entire scene appeared as 
if it were the work of one indi\-idual. The old mill part on the left was arranged 
by Sherman Eddj^ of Avon, Coimecticut, and the old forge to the right was 
sponsored by Woodbury Bartlett of Hamilton, Massachusetts. 

It can scarcely be expected that with the limits of this brief report that all 
of the numerous exhibits in other parts of the Mechanics Building can be 
discussed or even mentioned. All were uniformly excellent. The Women's 
Exhibitions Committee of the Horticultural Society staged a series of "Rain- 
bow Gardens" colorful, interesting, and practicable. The Garden Club 
Federation of Massachusetts tied its exhibit into the theme of the show as a 
whole through backgrounds and accessories, thus forming an ideal setting 
for the flower arrangements which were more artistic and colorful than in 
former years. Special exhibits such as those covering orchids, roses, carna- 
tions, house plants, succulents, and numerous others compared most favor- 
ably with those of previous j'ears. An outstanding feature which received 
uniform praise from the scores of thousands who were fortunate to see it was 
the magnificent Acacia exhibit of Mr. & Mrs. Robert Stone at the entrance 
of Exhibition Hall. Never were the numerous magnificent specimens, all in 
full bloom, displayed to greater advantage. 

It has been a pleasure to me to preside at the various meetings of the Com- 
mittee. Again I wish to express my personal appreciation for the fine coopera- 
tion that has been extended to us by all concerned, and especially to all 
exhibitors and to all members of the Committee who have ser^'ed so faithfully 
and so well. Already the planning of the main features of the Spring Show 
for 1951 is well advanced. This is merely mentioned in passing to emphasize 



ANNUAL MEETING 



35 



the fact that if we expect the next show to equal or exceed the one recently 
closed, there can be no delay in planning for the main features for the next 
year in justice to potential exhibitors. It is current and correct practice to 
commence the planning of the next year's show immediately after the close 
of the one for the current year. 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society, as an organization, is fortunate 
in its officials, and in its participating exhibitors. In spite of changing economic 
conditions, it is felt that we can look forward with confidence to a series of 
future exhibitions that will, in interest and value, equal, and sometimes 
exceed corresponding exhibitions of past years. I wish to repeat that in my 
actual experience, and my knowledge of organizations that sponsor flower 
shows in other large cities, that we in Boston are indeed fortunate. We are 
deeply indebted to our predecessors for the most excellent system that was 
evolved here; for it is, apparently, this system that has made the Massachu- 
setts Horticultural Society, the largest and most outstanding one in its field 
in America, and one that, in the world at large, is second only to the Royal 
Horticultural Society of London. 

E. D. Merrill, Chairman 
Committee on Exhibitions 




The Old Village Blacksmith Shop at 1950 Spring Flower Show 

By Bartlett Gardens 



36 ANNUAL MEETING 

Report of the Committee on Children's Gardens 

The 1949 Children's Show was the first one under the direction of the new 
Chairman of the Committee on Children's Gardens, Mrs. Roger S. Warner. 
Mrs. Henry D. Tudor and Mr. Daniel W. O'Brien, especially the latter, took 
a very active part in staging the 1949 show. There were 905 entries in the 
school and home garden section and 295 in the 4-H Club section, making a 
total of 1200 entries, which was sUghtly under the number of entries for 1948. 
This was due Ln a large measure to the very hot and excessively dry weather 
of the 1949 season, it being the driest summer in some forty years. 

The indi\adual vegetable classes had many entries. Notable among these 
was the class for sLx specimens of beets, which had 75 entries, sLx specimens 
of ripe tomatoes, which had 70 entries, and six specimens of green tomatoes, 
which had 74 entries. 

The quality of the vegetables was extremely high for a children's show 
and the judges had a real job on their hands to pick the first prize plate in 
many classes. Much of the over-crowding on the tables has been eliminated 
and the school garden exhibits had some excellent backgrounds and com- 
pared ver}'- favorably with exhibits staged by adult exhibitors at other shows. 
At the close of the show, the children again presented all the produce on 
exhibition to the Fruit and Flower Mission, who in turn sent the material to 
hospitals, homes for the aged, and other organizations on the list of the Fruit 
and Flower Mission. There was a marked increase in attendance at the show 
and the public was somewhat surprised that it was an exhibition of children's 
work, some of whom may become future members and possible exhibitors 
of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. 

The large school garden on the Cummings Estate in Woburn, operated by 
the Boston School Department in cooperation with the Park Department, as 
usual, had an excellent large display as well as many individual entries. The 
large display was of such high quality that the judges not only awarded it 
first prize but also the silver medal of the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society. The Massachusetts State Department of Agriculture awarded the 
same display a very fine sweepstake rosette because of the outstanding 
quality and size of the exhibit. Mrs. Henry D. Tudor, member of the Commit- 
tee, who has a particular interest in the children who participate in this 
Woburn Garden Project, has donated S350.00 as a fund for the purchase of 
milk for the children attending this garden through the summer season of 
1950. I might say that the children who participate in this project are in 
practically all cases from rather poor homes in the congested areas of the city 
of Boston, where in some cases they do not even see a blade of green grass 
growing from one year to another. 

The 4-H Club Exhibit in the upper hall, under the direction of Mr. Earle 
H. Nodine, Assistant State Club Leader, as usual filled the hall. It was of 
high quality and a credit to everyone connected with that department of 
the children's show. 

Acting in the capacity of Mr. Daniel W. O'Brien, a regular member of the 
Committee^ and presenting a report on the Children's Show for 1949, I wish 
to take this opportunity at the Annual Meeting of thanking the Massachu- 
setts Horticultural Society for their interest and genuine assistance to the 



ANNUAL MEETING 37 

school garden movement. I especially appreciate the enthusiasm of Secretary 
Arao H. Nehrling and the assistance given by Mr. Ellis Joy and his staff at 
Horticultural Hall. The entire personnel of the Society's office has always 
been of great assistance and very patient in working with the children at 
this show where upwards of 1200 individual exhibits are set up in approxi- 
mately four hours. 

Henry G. Wexdler for Daniel W. O'Brien, 
The Committee on Children's Gardens 

Report of the Committee on Prizes 

The Committee on Prizes is pleased to report a very busy and interesting 
year. The judging work ran along smoothly and there were only a few com- 
plaints, none of them of a serious nature. The Committee realizes fully its 
responsibility and gives the selection of judges for the various exhibitions a 
great deal of time and thought. 

Since Mr. Borowski, one of our members, decided to take a much needed 
vacation after Christmas we were confronted with the problem of selecting 
someone to take his place. President Ames suggested that Mr. Aubrey Butler, 
who had serv^ed as chairman of the Committee on Prizes for a number of 
years, be invited to assist at the Spring Show. Mr. Butler, who has a deep 
interest in the work of the Society accepted the assignment. 

The Committee judged the special classes at all the shows held in the course 
of the year. At the three smaller shows the Committee did all the judging. 
At the Camellia Show we were fortunate to have Dr. George 0. Clark assist us. 

The Committee judged at nine shows and held five meetings in the course 
of the year. At these meetings the list of judges is carefully screened and 
finally the most capable men are selected. Matters of policy are also brought 
up for consideration with the idea of keeping our system of judging as up to 
date as possible. 

The judging at the Spring Show was strenuous but proceeded orderly and 
with few interruptions. The Committee was called upon to review the scor- 
ing by the judges of certain exhibits which were requested within the time 
allotted for this purpose. In all cases the exhibitors were perfectly satisfied 
with this method of procedure. One protest was made after the time allotted, 
but this was finally handled by the secretary of the Society and the chairman 
of the Committee. 

The work of the Committee was made more pleasant because of the excel- 
lent cooperation it received from the many exhibitors. Minor problems 
with which the exhibitor is confronted can often be settled by merely calling 
attention to certain rules maintained by the Society and described in the 
"Rule Book for Exhibitors and Judges". 

The Committee appreciates the helpful attitude of the trustees, the staff 
at Horticultural Hall, the cooperation of Mr. Nehrling and his able assistant, 
Mrs. Lewis, as well as Miss Claire Sabadini who faithfully recorded the find- 
ings of the Committee. We would be remiss in our duty if we did not also extend 
our sincerest thanks to all the judges who so wholeheartedly assisted us at 
the major exhibitions of the Society. 

George B. Cabot, Chairman 
Thomas Milne, Co-chairman 



38 ANNUAL MEETING 

Report of the Library Committee 

During the year the unusually large number of 552 volumes were added to 
the library, bringing its total up to 30,069. These were acquired by purchase, 
for review, and by gift. A specially interesting accession was a collection of 
books from the Ubraiy of the late Mrs. Francis King, gardener, writer on 
garden topics, and George Robert White, medallist. These volumes, pre- 
J sented as a memorial to Mrs. King, were placed on special exhibition in the 

library and attracted a great deal of attention from \'isitors. 

The library is fortunate in that certain capital gifts to the endowment of 
the ^lassachusetts Horticultural Society were restricted in that it was speci- 
fied by the donors that the income should be used only for the purchase of 
books. This restricted income is normally sufficiently ample to more than 
cover the cost of needed items, in spite of the radically increased price of 
modem books and the really exorbitant prices demanded by many dealers 
in out of print works. Here again the libran.' is fortunate in that it already 
has on its shelves the most important of the early botanical and horticultural 
works, which were acquired years ago, and largely before the upsurge in book 
prices in the early decades of the present century. 

I beheve that all members of the Society will admit that the maintenance 
of a comprehensive horticultural librarj' is a legitimate acti\'ity of the Massa- 
chusetts Horticultural Society. It does no harm to repeat that our Ubrary is 
by far the largest one of its kind maintained by a society in North America, 
and is, in fact, one of the largest and most important libraries of its kind in 
the world. In making selections to be permanentl}' placed on its shelves the 
term horticulture is interpreted in a ver>' broad sense, so that the library 
serves its purpose not only within the field generally comprehended within 
the definition of horticulture, but also botany in a wide sense, conser\'ation, 
natm^ study, and even certain phases of agriculture (outside of gardening), 
and other allied subjects. One of our objectives is to strengthen our holdings 
in indi\-idual volumes and in sets of periodicals which are essential to the very 
extensive cUentele that utilizes our hbrarj- resources; and this cUentele in- 
cludes not only members of the Society itself, but also private indi\'iduals in 
a great variety of fields as well as staff members of teaching and research 
institutions scattered all over the country. 

It is, or should be, known to all of you that one of the privileges of mem- 
bership in the Massachusetts Horticultural Society is that of borrowing books 
from the library-, a privilege denied to others except research workers in 
various institutions who may borrow certain items, if needed, through normal 
inter-hbrarj" loan channels; but we do not loan direct to individuals who are 
not members of the Society. 

As the rather extraordinary resources of our library become more widely 
known, demands for ser^-ice tend to increase. Thus in circulation (and our 
library is not a general circulating one, but rather a hea^'ily restricted loan 
collection) neariy 5,000 volumes were sent out, mostly to members, in the 
past year. This was an increase over that of the preceding year; and it is 
significant that within the first three months of 1950 the figure is 2,037, which 
may indicate a much larger circulation for the calendar year 1950. 

Circulation figures are only a part of the picture. Xo records are kept of 



ANNUAL MEETING 39 

the number of individuals who consult volumes in the library each year, but 
the total is large. In addition to this, research workers in diverse fields, and 
individuals in various walks of life from all over the country write for special 
information or advice. Some of these special requests often test our resources 
in imexpected ways. Topics of special interest vary from year to year. At 
present there is a great local demand for data regarding flower arrangements 
and, perhaps unexpectedly, staff members and students of the Simmons 
School of Design have become more or less regular patrons of the library. 
There has been a steady demand for good illustrations, and our extensive 
collection of finely illustrated books is becoming well known among artists. 
Perhaps the time approaches when our very large collection of prints should 
be organized so that these may become more readily available. 

The library group is responsible for staffing the Massachusetts Horticul- 
tural Society information booth at the Spring Show each year. A special 
effort is made to present all phases of the work of the Society to best advan- 
tage. There is an increasing demand for speakers before various clubs and 
organizations of the library activities of the Society, and wherever possible 
such services are rendered. 

It is not the purpose of the Committee to go into great detail regarding the 
actual functions and workings of the library for here naturally we have to 
depend on the library staff. There have been few problems during the year on 
which Committee action has been needed, indicating that the library routine 
is progressing satisfactorily. Accordingly there has been somewhat fewer 
meetings of the committee than was the case in previous years. 

We are all more or less concerned with the problem of recataloging the 
library which has been in progress, on a part time basis, for seven years. At 
the end of December, 1949, work had been completed on just under 13,000 
volumes, but the average cost of recataloging these has been about $1.00 
each. It is suspected that a considerable number of the volumes thus handled 
were actually not worth more than the cost of recataloging, although many 
of them were, of course, extremely valuable works. There still remain, after 
seven years, about 4600 individual volumes to be recatalogued, as well as all 
of the periodicals, totalUng about 3500 sets, some 13,300 volumes. We are 
assured, however, that the recataloging of the periodical sets will proceed 
very much faster than has the handUng of the individual volumes. In the 
first three months of this year, 118 new books have been added, and 523 have 
been added to the new classes. 

Perhaps had the magnitude of the task of recataloging the library been 
realized seven years ago when the work was authorized and initiated, and an 
approximate estimate of the total cost then made, objections to the task 
might have been raised It must, of course, be realized that in the interim all 
costs have very materially increased, and any estimate made seven years ago 
would have been very far out of Une as of the present time. No matter what 
objections may be made to the cost of this project it seems to be clear that as 
the work is now so far advanced, it should be completed. It is, however, to be 
hoped that this can be consummated without delay, even if, in the interim, 
other activities of the library must be curtailed. Manifestly to a very con- 
siderable degree the usefulness of a speciaUzed library, as ours is, depends 
largely upon the skill with which its books are classified. At the present rate 



40 ANNUAL MEETING 

of progress, this task will not be completed for some years but already it is 
much easier to get at information on special subjects. With the new system, a 
constructive step has been made in reference to the classification not only of 
our specialized library, but a contribution as well for the benefit of similar 
Ubraries elsewhere. A condensed version of the new system of classification 
will appear in the Yearbook, and the complete schedule will be mimeographed 
for distribution to other libraries and to individuals especially interested in 
the subject. 

In any case, in its library activities, the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society is rendering a most valuable service to its members, to the numerous 
clients who visit the institution in quest of special information, and to the 
broad field of horticulture not only locally but nationally and to a certain 
degree internationally. These Ubrary activities are, after all, in the world at 
large, one of the most widely and most favorably known activities of the 
Society. 

This report has been prepared for and is submitted on behalf of the mem- 
bers of the Library Committee, who have loyally attended the meetings that 
the Hbrarian has requested. Their services are greatly appreciated. 

E. D. Merrill, Chairman 
Committee on Library 

Report of the Treasurer 

In my second report as Treasurer, it is a great satisfaction to be able to 
tell you that your Society's operations for the fiscal year ended December 31, 
1949, were carried on with income exceeding expenses by a reasonable margin. 
Our expenses in almost all departments tended to increase over those of the 
preceding year. More was spent on our wonderful Ubrary. Funds expended on 
lectures, awards, medals and certificates also increased, yet thanks, primarily, 
to another successful Spring Show and to increased income from our invested 
funds, total receipts exceeded total expenditures by $3,721. Adjusting this 
net figure, in conformity with our usual bookkeeping practice, to reflect 
accumulated income adjustments on our restricted funds, the final results for 

1949 show that income exceeded expenditures by $7,239 as against a com- 
parable figure of $9,107 for the year ended December 31, 1948. 

Last year, at our annual meeting, in trying to forecast the 1949 results, I 
remarked that I should not be unhappy if we could break even for the year. 
We have done better than that; and in view of the excellent results of the 

1950 Spring Show I am hopeful that the 1950 results will be at least as good 
as those of 1949 even though our expenses tend to chmb as our activities 
expand over a wider sphere. 

The itemized figures of our audited financial report for 1949 are so volumi- 
nous that I shall not attempt to read them to you. They are available, of 
course, to any of our members who may be interested. I think, however, that 
in connection with some of the many items that comprise our financial state- 
ment you will be interested to know that Garden Week, despite the relatively 
heavy pioneering expense that any new venture involves, was carried out 
with very little loss, that our Autumn Show contributed a much smaller 
deficit than usual and that "Horticulture", our publication, made a favorable 
showing for the year. 

Stedman Buttrick 
Treasurer 



ANNUAL MEETING 41 

REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION ON 
DECEMBER 31, 1949 

ASSETS 

Cash in banks and on hand $ 38,638 . 84 

Accounts receivable — HORTICULTURE . 5, 530 . 96 

Investments valued at book value 813,202.28 

Capital Assets 592,586. 38 

Real Estate $498,564. 63 

Improvements and additions to building. . 47,441 . 28 

Library 46,580.47 

$592,586.38 

Deferred Charges 9,711 . 51 

Spring Show, 1950 $ 4,535.83 

Garden Week, 1950 122. 13 

Plant Buyers Guide Inventory 5,053 . 55 

$ 9,711.51 



,459,669.97 



LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL FUNDS 

Liabilities — Accounts Payable $ 4,053 . 76 

Sundry Funds 604,669. 51 

Special Uses: Principal. . . . $167,919.64 

Unexpended income 5,222 . 67 $173,142 . 31 



General Uses: Principal 431,527.20 

$604,669.51 



Greater Endowment Fund 36,841 . 46 

Balance, January 1, 1949 $ 36,741 .46 

Net addition— 1949 100.00 



$ 36,841.46 



Life Membership fees 31,191 .00 

Mount Auburn Cemetery Fund 55,053 . 52 

Show Insurance Fund 53,401 . 64 

Capital 564,524.70 

Surplus (Capital) 82,496. 14 

Balance, Januaiy 1, 1949 $ 81,929. 72 

Add : Net gain on securities sold 566 . 42 

$ 82,496.14 



Surplus (Earned) 27,438. 24 

$1,459,669.97 



42 ANNUAL MEETING 

STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 

INCOME 

19If9 1948 

Income from investments $ 45,173. 17 S 40,981 . 53 

Membership fees (after members subscrip- 
tions to Horticulture) 17,385 . 87 16,370 . 69 

Rentals 15,066.70 11,217.11 

Spring Show 60,607.96 71,490.66 

Autumn Show 1,027 M 2,846-87 

Horticulture 1,056.39 4,690.43 

Garden Week 215.71 

Other receipts 792.50 818.05 

$138,839.04 $133,340.74 

EXPENDITURES 

Building expenses $ 35,316.85 $ 35,472.55 

Library expenses 14,708.85 12,232.89 

Office and general salaries and expenses. . . . 46,404.44 43,075.75 

Miscellaneous exhibition expenses 7,708 . 28 5,407 . 84 

Awards, Lectures, Medals and Certificates: 

Lectures paid from general funds 391 . 24 218 . 65 

Prizes, medals and certificates paid from 

general funds 4,114.03 2,890.52 

Prizes, medals and certificates paid from 

Spring Show 21,420.57 20,286.56 

Medals, lectures, etc., paid from re- 
stricted funds 1,804. 53 2,751 . 11 

Awards at shows paid from restricted 

funds 3,248.34 3,932.82 

$135,117.13 $126,268.69 
Excess of Income over Expenditures, All 

Funds $ 3,721.91 S 7,072.05 

Elimination of Expenses included above 

paid from restricted funds 10,228 . 94 8,728 . 54 

$ 13,950.85 $ 15,800.59 
EUmination of income included above al- 
located to restricted funds 6,710.87 6,693.08 

Excess of Income over Expenditures — 
General Funds $ 7,239.98 $ 9,107.51 



RESULT OF THE BALLOTING 

At 4:00 o'clock the polls were closed, 64 votes having been cast, and the 
following persons were declared elected : 

President: — John S. Ames. 

Vice President: Dr. George 0. Clark. 

Trustees: (For three years) Mr. Ernest Borowski, Mrs. S. V. R. Crosby, 
Prof. Ray M. Koon, Dr. Ebner D. Merrill and Mr. Harold S. Ross. 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

May 11949 -May 1,1950 

HORTICULTURE 

General 

Balch, W. B. (and others) Horticulture enterprises; revised ed.l949 
Farnham, R. B. and Ingham, V. W. The home owner's guide to better 

lawns, trees and gardens. 1946 
Farrington, E. I. The gardener's almanac. 1949 

Garris, E. W. and Wolfe, H. S. Southern horticulture management. 1949 
Gilbert, C. C. Success without soil: how to grow plants by hydroponics. 

1948 
Hurley, P. J. An encyclopedia for Austrahan gardeners. 1946 
Jenkins, D. H. Weekend gardener. 1950 
Simon, M. J. (and others) Complete garden handbook. 1950 
Swarbrick, T. Harnessing the hormone: the use of growth regulating sub- 
stances in gardens, fields and orchards. 1946? 
Wellesley-in-Nassau. The garden workbook and diary. 1949 
Wilkinson, A. E. and Tiedjens, V. A, The handy book of gardening. 1950 
Wilson, A. How does your garden grow? 1949 

Propagation and Pruning 

Grant, J. and Grant, C. Pruning is simple. 1948 

Hottes, A. C. How to increase plants. 1949 

Longmire, A. A. Secrets of successful propagation: methods old and new. 

1949 
Sheat, W. G. Propagation of trees, shrubs and conifers. 1949 
U. S. Forest Service. Woody-plant seed manual. 1949 

AUXILIARY SCIENCES 
Soils 

American Society of Agronomy. Hunger signs in crops; rev. ed. 1949 

Bear, F. E. (and others) Diagnostic techniques for soils and crops, their 
value and use in estimating the fertility status of soils . . . 1948 

Cook, R. L. and Millar, C. E. Plant nutrient deficiences. 1949 

Faulkner, R. Garden manures and fertihzers. 1949 

Gilbert, F. A. Mineral nutrition of plants and animals. 1949 

Rodale, J. I. The organic front. 1949 

Wickenden, L. Make friends with your land: a chemist looks at agricul- 
ture. 1949 

Diseases and pests 
Westcott, C. Plant disease handbook. 1950 

ORNAMENTAL PLANTS 
General 

Correvon, H. Flore alpine; 4e 6d. 1939 

De Boer, S. R. Around the seasons in Denver parks and gardens. 1948 

Hottes, A. C. Flower garden for the amateur. 1949 

Innes, W. T. Goldfish varieties and water gardens. 1947 

43 



44 BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Robbins, A. R. How to grow annuals. 1949 
Solly, C. Solly's flower book: annual flowers. 1948 
Wheelwright, E. G. The garden of pleasant flowers; rev. ed. 1948 

Shrubs and trees 

Brooks, R. L. Trees of the West Indies, their cultivation and care. 1947 

Colvin, B. and Tyrwhitt, J. Trees for town and country. 1947 

Godunov, A. Z. Surgery with a spade. 1949 

Hill, D., nursery co. Hill's evergreens; rev. ed. 1949 

Hottes, A. C. The book of shrubs; 5th ed. 1950 

Lord, E. E. Shrubs and trees for AustraUan gardens. 1948 

Greenhouse and house plants 

Duruz, W. P. Principles of nursery management. 1950 

Hersey, J. Garden in your window. 1949 

Lawrence, W. J. C. Science and the glasshouse. 1948 

Naumberg, S. Trick of growing house plants in every window. 1949 

Post, K. Florist crop production and marketing. 1949 

Monographs 

American Camellia Society. American CamelUa yearbook. 1949 

American Rhododendron Society. The rhododendron yearbook. 1949 

American Rose Society. American rose annual. 1949 

Anley, G. G. Irises, their culture and selection. 1948 

Brown, W. Tuberous begonias, a complete guide for amateur and spe- 
ciahst. 1948 

Cayeux, L. Le dahlia. 1934 

Ebel, M. Hydrangea et hortensia, multiplication et culture commerciale. 
1933 

Eklund, G. M. Kaktusboken. 1935-6. 2 vols. 

Haselton, S. E. Epiphyllum handbook. 1946 

Higgins, V. Succulent plants illustrated. 1949 

Knebel, C. Phyllocactus. 1949 

Logan, H. B. Jr. and Gosper, L. C. Orchids are easy to grow. 1949 

Mitchell, S. B. Iris for every garden. 1949 

New England Gladiolus Society. Gladiolus (yearbook). 1950 

Norris, F. R. Grow your own roses. 1949 

North American Lily Society. Lily yearbook. 1949 

Northen, R. T. Home orchid growing. 1950 

Norton, J. B. S. Descriptive catalog of hemerocallis clones, 1893-1948 

Oregon Camellia Society. Camellias as a hobby. 1949 

. Camellias illustrated; 2d ed. 1948 

Royal Horticultural Society. Daffodil and tulip yearbook. 1949 

. List of daffodil names. 1907. 

Smith, N. G. Dahlia cultivation. 1949 

Southern Cahfornia Camellia Societ3^ The camellia, its culture and no- 
menclature. 1947 

. Same; 2d rev. ed. 1949 

Tirocco, G. B. The camellia; trans, from the Italian by Claude Chidamian. 
1949 

Ward, F. K. Rhododendrons. 1950 

Willoughby, A. C. Orchids and how to grow them. 1950 

Wilson, H. V. P. The African violet, saintpaulia; rev. ed. 1949 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 45 

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

Brown, H. D. Vegetable science. 1949 

Childers, N. F. Fruit science: orchard and small fruit management. 1949 

Cummings, M. B. The berry book: brambles and other berries. 1948 

Gregg, T. A handbook of fruit culture. 1873 

Hardenburg, E. V. Potato production. 1949 

Jones, I. Vines in the sun: a journey through the California vineyards. 

1949 
Knott, J. E. Vegetable growing; 4th ed. 1949 
McCallan, E. A. Bermuda home vegetable garden. 1943 
Pihl, A. and Eriksson, J. Svenska fruktsorter. 1912 
Rettew, G. R. Manual of mushroom culture; ed. 4. 1948 
Smith, G. L. Practical nut growing. 1949 
Thompson, Homer C. Vegetable crops; 4th ed. 1949 
Waldin, W. Truck farming in the Everglades. 1912? 
Wallace, H. A. Com and corn growing; 5th ed. 1949 

AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS 

Gaylord, I. Cooking with an accent: the herb grower's cookbook. 1949 

Jarchow, M. E. The earth brought forth: a history of Minnesota agricul- 
ture to 1885. 1949 

Jones, L. C. The Farmers' Museum. (New York State Historical Associa- 
tion) 1948 

King, F. H. Farmers of forty centuries; rev. ed. 1949 

Pearson, H. S. Fifteen ways to make money in the country. 1949 

Rodale, J. I. The healthy Hunzas. 1948 

Sykes, F. Humus and the farmer. 1949 

Woodward, C. R. The development of agriculture in New Jersey, 1640- 
1880. 1927 

NATURAL HISTORY 

Fabre, J. H. The msect world of J. Henri Fabre; ed. by 13. W. Teale. 1949 

Krutch, J. W. The twelve seasons. 1949 

Scudder, S. H. The life of a butterfly: a chapter in natural history for the 

general reader. 1893 
Stuart, F. S. City of the bees. 1949 

Birds 

Headstrom, R. Birds' nests, a field guide. 1949 
Pettit, T. Birds in your backyard. 1949 
Zim, H. S. and Gabrielson, I. N. Birds. 1950 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Economics and education 

Hamlin, H. M. Agricultural education in community schools. 1949 

Plant buyers' guide; 5th ed. 1949 

Witthoft, J. Green corn ceremoniaUsm in the eastern woodlands. 1949 

Garden clubs and flower shows 

Boyd, L. E. Garden club memories. 1950 

Fisher, A. Flower shows and how to judge them. 1938 



46 BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Leach, L., comp. The National Council of State Garden Clubs, the first 

twenty years. 1949 
National Council of State Garden Clubs. Handbook for flower shows, 

staging, exhibiting, judging; ed. by Esther Grayson. 1949 
Robert, H. M. Robert's rules of order; rev. ed. 1943. 

Conservation 

Carter, V. G. Man on the landscape: the fundamentals of plant conserva- 
tion. 1949 
Lord, R. Forever the land: a country chronicle and anthology. 1950 
Ordway, S. H. A conservation handbook. 1949 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Aul, H. B. How to beautify and improve your home ground. 1949 
Hawkins, R. R. and Abbe, C. H. Home mechanics outdoor handbook 

1950 
Hobbs, H. J. How to build garden furniture. 1947 
Levison, J. J. Home book of trees and shrubs; 2d ed. 1949 
Mack, C. F. and Mack, P. Plants for gardens in the shade. 1949 
Matthews, J. W. Garden treasures: choice flowering plants for Australia 

and New Zealand. 1947 
Sir^n, O. Gardens of China, 1949 

Tunnard, C. Gardens in the modern landscape; 2d rev. ed. 1949 
Vera, A. Les jardins. 1919 
Wyman, D. Shrubs and vines for American gardens. 1949 

BOTANY 

General works 

Anderson, E. Introgressive hybridization. 1949 

Avebury, J. L., baron. On buds and stipules. 1899 

Bailey, L. H. Manual of cultivated plants; 2d ed. 1948 

Clements, F. E. Dynamics of vegetation. 1949 

Emerson, F. W. and Shields, L. M. Laboratory and field exercises in 

botany. 1949 
Gates, F. C. Field manual of plant ecology. 1949 
Hertrich, W. The Huntington Botanical Gardens, 1905-1949. 
Jackson, B. D. A glossary of botanic terms; 4th rev. and enl. ed. 1948 
Knight, R. L. A dictionary of genetics. 1948 
Kramer, P. J. Plant and soil water relationships. 1949 
Moldenke, H. N. A brief course in elementary systematic botany for 

gardeners. 1947 
Newbigin, M. Plant and animal geography. 1949 
Quelch, M. T. Herbs and how to know them. 1946 
Wissler. C. The cereals and civiUzation. 1948 

Monographs 

Bowers, N. A. Cone-bearing trees of the Pacific coast. 1942 

Camus, A. Les cypres. 1914 

Hawkes, J. G. Potato collecting expeditions in Mexico and South America. 

1941 
More, R. E^ Colorado evergreens; 2d ed. 1949 
Traub, H. P. and Moldenke, H. N. Amaryllidaceae: tribe amarylleae. 

1949 



BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 47 

Floras — United States 

Bailey, V. L. and Bailey, H. E: Woody plants of the western national 

parks. 1949 
Hardy, G. A. and Hardy, W. Wild flowers in the Rockies. 1949 
Moldenke, H. N. American wild flowers. 1949 
Stefferud, A. How to know the wild flowers. 1950 
Taylor, K. S. Travellers' guide to roadside wild flowers, shrubs and trees of 

the United States. 1949 
U. S. Department of Agriculture. Trees, the yearbook of agriculture for 

1949 

Floras — Other countries 

Good, R. The geography of flowering plants. 1947 

Hall, C. A. Wild flowers in their haUnts. 1949 

Jahandiez, E. and Maire, R. Catalogue des plantes du Maroc. 1931- 

1941. 4 vols. 
Makins, F. K. Identification of trees and shrubs; 2d ed. 1948 
Rupp, H. M. R. The orchids of New South Wales. 1943 
Tansley, A. G. Britain's green mantle, past, present and future. 1949 

ESSAYS AND POETRY 

Chandler, J. C. The romance of the rose. 1949 

Count, E. W. 4000 years of Christmas. 1948 

Gannett, L. Cream Hill. 1949 

Hanchett, J. T. The future of evolution, with an appendix of verse. 1949 

Hottes, A. C. Garden facts and fancies. 1949 

Jensen, J. The clearing: a way of Hfe. 1949 

Leopold, A. Sand County almanac. 1949 

Parmenter, R. The plant in my window. 1949 

Rothery, A. The joyful gardener. 1949 

FINE ARTS 

Bustanoby, J. H. Principles of color and color mixing. 1947 

Graves, M. Art of color and design. 1941 

Kennedy, R. W. The renaissance painter's garden. 1948 

Munsell, A. H. Color notation. 1947 

Rutt, A. H. Home furnishing; 2d ed. 1948 

Salinger, M. Flowers: the flower piece in European painting. 1949 

Whittet, G. S. Bouquet: a galaxy of flower painting. 1949 

Flower arrangement 

Blaxland, H. Flower pieces. 1946 

Gannon, R. Winter bouquets with color. 1949 

Roberts, P. E. Flower craft. 1949 

Schaeffer, R. Flower arrangement. 1935 

Wilson, H. V. P. Flower arrangement calendar. 1949 

Wright, R. House and Garden's portfoUo of 25 flower prints. 1948 

BIOGRAPHY 

Albus, H. J. The peanut man: the Hfe of George Washington Carver. 1948 
Dies, E. J. Titans of the soil: great builders of agriculture. 1949 
Leger, C. Redouts et son temps. 1945 

Rodgers, A. D. Liberty Hyde Bailey: a story of American plant sciences. 
1949 



48 BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIBRARY 

Schweitzer, A. On the edge of the primeval forest, and, More from the 

primeval forest. 1948 
Wright, R. L. Gardener's tribute. 1949 

TRAVEL PLANT HUNTING 

David, J. P. A., abb4. Abb4 David's diary . . . trans, and ed. by Helen 

M. Fox. 1949 
Farrington, E. I. The gardener's travel book; rev. ed. 1949 
Peattie, D. C. American heartwood. 1949 
Peattie, R. The Great Smokies and the Blue Ridge. 1943 
Rogers, C. Trodden glory: the story of the California poppy, with a 

description of some Russians. 1949 
Scidmore, E. R. Java, the garden of the East. 1897 

CHILDREN'S BOOKS 

Chapman, D. H. The seasons and the woodman. 1949 

Masters, R. V. Child's garden of flowers. 1949 

Masters, R. V. Child's garden of vegetables. 1949 

McClintock, M. Leaf, fruit and flower: a nature primer. 1948 

McClintock, M. Let's learn the flowers. 1948 

Parker, B. M. FaU is here. 1948 

Parker, B. M. Spring is here. 1948 

Parker, B. M, Summer is here. 1948 

Parker, B. M. Winter is here. 1948 

Tresselt, A. Johnny maple-leaf. 1948 

Webber, I. E. Bits that grow big: where plants come from. 1949 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Rehder, A. BibHography of cultivated trees and shrubs hardy in the cooler 

temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. 1949 
Winship, G. P. Gutenberg to Plantin, an outline of the early history of 

printing. 1926 

GIFTS TO THE LIBRARY 

The Massachusetts Horticultural Society acknowledges with thanks gifts 
to the Ubrary from the following donors: 

Allen, Vera L. The life of a butterfly, by Samuel H. Scudder 
Bastille, Mrs. D. 0. and Miss Esther Jackson. A collection of books 

from the Ubrary of the late Robert T. Jackson 
Bemis, Mrs. H. H. A file of the Bulletms of the Garden Club of America 
Clark, Dr. George 0. A collection of seed and nursery catalogues 
Clark, Raymond F. 

The soil and its management by M. F. Miller 

Sanford Arboretum catalog and planting list 

Principles of floriculture, by E. A. White 
Cook, Mrs. Robert H. A collection of books from the Ubrary of the late 

Mrs. Francis King 
Crosby, Mrs. S. V. R. Gazette iUustr^e des Amateurs de Jardins, 1940-'47 
Gray Herbarium, Harvard University. A brief course in elementary 

systematic botany for gardeners, by H. N. Moldenke 
Herb Society of America. Collecteana pharmaceutica suecica, v.3., of 

the Kungl. Farmaceutiska Institutets BibUotek, Stockholm 



NEW CLASSIFICATION 49 

Herb Society op America. New England Unit. 120 watercolors 
of wild flowers of England, by Ellen Key, 3 volumes. In memory of 
Helen Noyes Webster 

Hosmer, Mrs. H. B. A sketch of the botany of South Carolina and 
Georgia, by Stephen Elliott 

Krabek, Wilfred B. A collection of seed and nursery catalogues 

Rettew, G. Raymond. Manual of mushroom culture; 4th edition. 



THE NEW CLASSIFICATION FOR THE LIBRARY 

Dorothy S. Manks, Librarian 

Each year recently the Report of the Library Committee has included a 
paragraph on the progress of reclassifjdng and recataloguing the hbrary. For 
any collection of 30,000 volumes this is a momentous undertaking. When, 
in addition to the work on the books themselves, the scheme by which they 
are classified must also be devised, the project becomes even more difficult 
and compUcated. In our case this was necessary, for a careful search produced 
no classification which met our requirements. Other Hbraries in our field 
agreed that a new Hbrary classification for horticulture was needed, and urged 
us to attempt it. 

Such a scheme has been made, and in a condensed version is now presented. 
To print it here in full would take many pages, but the unabridged form is 
available to anyone who wishes to see it. 

Under each broad general class the purpose has been to present an orderly 
and logical sequence of ideas, so that topics standing together have some re- 
lationship with each other. The gaps in the numbering are due partly to the 
abridgment, partly to a technical mechanical arrangement by which new 
topics, as they arise, may be inserted in their proper places. In this way it is 
hoped that the work of reorganization may not have to be repeated, but that 
the scheme may be indefinitely flexible to meet the needs of future horticul- 
ture. 

A HORTICULTURE 

1 General works 

12 Encyclopedias and dictionaries 

16 Children's books 

17 School gardening practice 

For administration see H31 

3 Propagation. Nursery management 

4 Special cultural techniques 

42 Electroculture 

43 Chemical culture 

45 Plant growth regulators 

5 Pruning. Training. EspaUer 

6 Harvesting. Curing. Storage ^ 
8 Research methods and techniques 



50 NEW CLASSIFICATION 

B AUXILIARY SCIENCES 

4 Soil sciences 

5 Plant health 

53 Diseases 

54 Insects. Economic entomology 
58 Weeds and weed control 

C CULTURE OF ORNAMENTAL PLANTS 

1 General works 

14 Special cultural techniques. Greenhouse management. House 
plants 

6 Garden types 

61 Rock and alpine gardening 

62 Water gardening 

63 Wild gardening 

64 City gardening 

8 Plant types 

81 Annuals 

82 Perennials 

83 Bulbs 

84 Woody plants 

9 Individual plants. Subdivide by name of plant 

Include culture, history and description of cultivated forms of gar- 
den plants. For botanical studies see N9 

D CULTURE OF FOOD PLANTS 

1 General works including both fruits and vegetables 

2 Vegetable gardening 

29 Individual vegetables 

3 Herb gardening 

39 Individual herbs 

4 Fruit culture 

49 Individual fruits 

E AGRICULTURE 

1 General works 

7 Technology of manufactured products 
74 Home economics 

9 Individual crops. Subdivide by name of plant 

Include works on field crops. When a plant may be grown as either 
garden or field crop (e.g. corn) class in D29, D39, or D49 as required 

F FORESTRY 

G GENERAL SCIENCE 

1 General works 

2 Mathematical and physical sciences 



NEW CLASSIFICATION 51 



Biological sciences 
33 Zoology 
334 Birds 



H SOCIAL SCIENCES 

1 Government and agriculture. Legislation. Plant patents. Plant 

quarantine regulations 

2 Community life 

22 Community activities 

221 Garden club management 

222 Flower show management. Judging 
24 Manners and customs 

For folklore and legends see R3 

3 Education 

31 Elementary and secondary education. School garden administra- 

tion 

32 Professional training 

4 Economics 

41 Land utiUzation. Conservation 

42 Business management. Accounting and bookkeeping 



L LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

1 General works 

3 Principles of design 

39 Evolution of design. History of landscape design. 

Class here general histories, not limited to a single country or 
period. The history of landscape architecture in a country is 
classed with other material on the gardens of the country in L9 

4 Design according to use 

41 Pleasure gardens. Home gardens. Private estates 
6 Elements and materials of design 

61 Ground forms 

62 Planting design. Carpet bedding. Parterres. Mazes 

63 Plants, vegetative types 

Class here books written from the point of view of decorative 
value in the garden. For books which include both decorative 
values and cultivation, prefer class C 

64 Plants, decorative characters. FoUage. Ornamental fruits. Habit 

of growth. Fragrance 

65 Plants, ecological conditions. Seasons. Sun and shade. Soil and 

moisture 

66 Plants, decorative uses. Topiary. Street and city conditions. 

Ground covers. Hedges. Foundation planting 
69 Structures in landscape. Paths. Pools. Walls and fences. Orna- 
ments and furniture. Lighting effects. Garden houses 
9 Description and history of gardens. Subdivide by country 



52 NEW CLASSIFICATION 

M ARCHITECTURE AND LAND DEVELOPMENT 

1 Architecture 

2 Land development and construction 

N BOTANY 

1 General works. But prefer N14-15 
119 History 
12 Encyclopedias and dictionaries. Plant names 

For rules for the making of scientific names see N81 

14 Textbooks 

15 Popular works 

16 Children's books 
4 Botanical institutions 

6 Biological botany 

In place of N6 undivided prefer N14 

61 Morphology. Anatomy. Teratology 

62 Physiology 

63 Ecology 

64 Evolution. Genetics. Plant breeding 

7 Economic plants 

71 Food plants 

72 Medicinal, drug, and poisonous plants 

73 Industrial plants 

8 Descriptive and systematic botany 

81 Nomenclature 

82 General descriptive works, non-systematic 

821 Pre-Linnaean, including herbals 

822 Post-Linnaean, including icones 

83 Systematic works. Taxonomy 
831 Botany of cultivated plants 

9 Individual plants. Subdivide by name of plant 

P GEOGRAPHIC BOTANY. FLORAS 



1 

2 
2 
3 


Plant geography 

- 9 Flora. Subdivide the continents by country 

Europe 

Asia 


4 
5 


Africa and Madagascar 
Australasia 


6 


Pacific Islands 


7 


North America 


8 


Central and South America 


9 


Arctica and Antarctica 


LITERATURE 


1 
2 
3 


Essays 
Poetry 
Legends and mythology 



FRUIT AND FLOWER MISSION 53 

S FINE ARTS 

1 General works 

2 Methods and materials 

21 Drawing and painting 

22 Photography 

23 Color, including color standards and nomenclature 

3 Plants in art 

31 Pictorial representations, including still life paintings 

32 Nature in design 

33 Flower arrangement 

T BIOGRAPHY 

V TRAVEL PLANT HUNTING 

X GENERAL REFERENCE 

1 Bibliography 

4 General dictionaries and encyclopedias 
9 Library administration 

BENEVOLENT FRATERNITY 
FRUIT and FLOWER MISSION 

Twenty-five years have just passed since the trustees of the Horticultural 
Society took the Fruit and Flower Mission under its wing, as it were. That 
they have been years of steady, though quiet growth, is in great measure 
due to the fact that there has been a permanent headquarters from which to 
operate. The constant kindness and cooperation shown us by all who are in 
any way connected with the work of the Society has made it a real joy to 
work here. One of the most appreciated services we are able to render is made 
possible through the gifts of the flowers shown at the various exhibits at the 
Hall. 

In the words of a popular advertisement — "Something new has been 
added" this past year. With the coming of a new Executive Secretary, there 
has been a new stirring of interest in the work. The number of volunteer 
workers has doubled and the new people have shown a wonderful spirit of 
helpfulness in every way. With the addition of eight new Directors, the story 
of our Mission has reached many new organizations with a resultant increase 
in the number of Hohday Baskets we were able to send out during Easter, 
Thanksgiving and Christmas. The total number of baskets and gifts sent this 
year was over 800. All this meant a tremendous amount of work on the part 
of thirty workers who made the baskets and the nine volunteer drivers. 

The summer project, known as "Hamper Work," was most successful 
the past season. A total of over 900 hampers and other containers of garden 
flowers and produce was sent in to the four distribution Centers and many 
thousands of city-bound people were made happier by the hard work done 
by all the interested suburban folks who made this possible. The town 
of Harvard set an all-time high record by sending in 228 containers of flowers 



54 NECROLOGY 

and quantities of fresh vegetables to the North End of Boston. In all twenty- 
eight towns worked with us to bring cheer to the dreary sections of Boston 
where a bit of the country is so much appreciated. Garden Clubs find this work 
most interesting and are eager to do more as they learn the real value of the 
service we render through their contributions of the fruits of their gardens. We 
always stand ready to help any Club with their program by telling the interest- 
ing history of the Fruit and Flower Mission. 

Through the kindness of one of the members of the Horticultural Society, 
there are forty-five persons who have beautiful memories to cherish of the 
beauties and wonders of the Annual Spring Show of the Society. To give this 
rare treat to so many people who could not possibly afford such an indulgence, 
has been the kindly custom of this generous donor for many years. 

While the number of hospitals and other institutions reached by the flowers 
from the monthly exhibitions held at the Hall has been about the same as in 
former years — about fifty — we reached many that had not had this treat 
before, and sent out a great many more to shut-ins in their Httle homes. As 
one of the new things that has been added, this past year, there was a more 
personal contact made between the recipients and the workers. Many calls 
were made while dehvering the flowers, and we were able to make our Ust of 
cHents more flexible thereby. 

A project in which we were happy to have a part was the back yard garden 
contest, known as " Yardville." After one of the most attractive of the exhibits 
at the Hall, we sent quantities of the fern plants to the South End House and 
the Boston Tuberculosis Association for use in this project in the South End 
of Boston. 

In many other ways, too numerous to mention, the Fruit and Flower Mis- 
sion shows signs of healthy growth, even though it has now reached the ad- 
vanced age of eighty-one years. 

Ida a. Perkins 
Executive Secretary 



NECROLOGY 

A list of the members of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society whose 
deaths were reported during the year ending May 1, 1950. 

Mrs. Charles S. Aldrich Mr. Oswald H. Beames 

Mr. Patrick Allen Miss Johanne Beer 

Mrs. Thomas Allen Miss Elsie W. Bird 

Mrs. Hob art Ames Miss Alice E. Brett 

Prof. Oakes Ames Miss Louise Buckland 

Miss Sarah G. Ajtorews Mrs. William L. Butcher 

Mr. Walter A. Angell Mrs. Richard B. Carter 

Mrs. Harry D. Archambault Rev. Robert F. Cheney 

Miss Anne Baker Mrs. Hugh Cochrane 

Mr. George J. Ball Dr. Susan M. Coffin 

Mrs. Hugh Bancroft Miss Mary E. Cormerais 

Mrs. E. Dorothy Batchelder Mr. James P. Cotter 



NECROLOGY continued 



55 



Mrs. R. T. Crane, Jr. 
Mrs. Allen Curtis 
Mrs. C. H. Dahl 
Mrs. Ernest B. Dane 
Mr. Frank S. Davis 
Mrs. Myron M. Davis 
Mr. Arthur L. Dexter 
Miss Daisy G. Driver 
Mrs. Grace Eliot Dudley 
Miss Martha B. Dunham 
Miss Ellen A. Early 
Mr. Newton R. Elliott 
Mrs. Philip Evans 
Mr. Henry M. Faxon 
Mr. Charles E. Fitz 
Mrs. H. Bruce Fletcher 
Mr. David Eraser 
Miss Florence H. Fremmer 
Mr. L. Merton Gage 
Mr. W. Erwin Gilchrist 
Miss Lucy D. Gillett 
Mr. Michael J. Hachey 
Mr. John G. Hall 
Mr. Edward C. Hammond 
Mr. William B. Hanna 
Mrs. John H. Harwood 
Mr. Clement S. Houghton 
Mr. Charles B. Hoyt 
Mr. Albert H. Inman 
Mrs. Franklin R. Ire son 
Mrs. Benjamin W. Iris 
Mr. William J. Kennedy 
Mrs. Benjamin Kimball 
Mr. Herbert R. Kinney 
Mr. William P. Land 
Mrs. John B. Lang 
Mrs. Frank S. Larkin 
Mr. Francis Lazenby 
Mr. Walter E. Lenk 
Mrs. Nellie M. Lindsey 
Mr. Franklin E. Low 



Mrs, Malcolm F. MacLean 
Mrs. Gertrude McKittrick 
Mrs. Ralph S. Megathlin 
Mr. J. Lee Mellsop 
Mr. Peter S. Myatt 
Mrs. Everett Paine 
Mr. Thomas E. Parker 
Mr. Lewis Parkhurst 
Mr. Charles E. Paterson 
Mrs. Craig L. Pattingill 
Mr. William C. Pickersgill 
Miss Grace W. Quincy 
Mrs. Edward H. Rathbun 
Mr. Alfred Rehder 
Mrs. Harry L. Robinson 
Mrs. Alexander H. Rogers 
Mrs. Linda C. Rogers 
Mrs. John H. Ross 
Mr. Fred W. Rust 
Mrs. William R. Sampson 
Mrs. Ida H. Schwartz 
Mr. Fred Shaw 
Mrs. Henry E. Sheldon 
Miss Eva L. Simmons 
Mrs. Joseph H. Soliday 
Mrs. Philip L. Spalding 
Mr. W. J. Spaulding 
Miss Emma A. Thompson 
Dr. R. S. Titus 
Mr. Willl^m a. Trow 
Miss Katherine L. Tuttle 
Mr. Louis Vasseur 
Mrs. Henry G. Vaughan 
Miss Florence E. Walkins 
Mrs. Lauriston Ward 
Miss Mabel L. Washburn 
Mr. Edwin S. Webster 
Mrs. Charles F. Whitehouse 
Miss Charlotte B. Winsor 
Miss Ada M. Woodward 
Mrs. William L. Wright 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

1942 Lgkd Abebcoxwat. Nonh W^.^^ "- ^".and 

194S F. A. B.LP,TL^TT, S-i-:ord, Con::-:-::^: 

1942 Waltz ?. Z ' 3 ?. : - : - 1 1 . little C -z:z. Rhode Island 

1942 Db.. V.-:ll:,.^f a. Dayt^: '^'\?z:zz-- I' C. 

1942 Dav:: FaZschilt. 'T" : - - u: Grovc, I,cr.z-^ 

1942 J-5i?E B. Gaeii -- -artetown, Peniijv i^ . 

1942 Hz V7T H::s^ '^ :rv. Langldbiid, : ': 

1942 Przi H H - Az: : : -tebdlo, Odifanii^ 

1942 CoLON-EL R, H. M : >~ -^omkkt, Coeonni Grove, Floiida 

1942 RoBEBT :: z ^ ^ ^ -V New YoA 

19*2 G. G. Nzafjn . -. i, New Jeney 

1^42 Fz.z: z?.: :z Law OLacim, BrookBat, MjmwuJhmm.IIii 

1 942 > - ? ^ Z 1 I2.1BETH Pbcbbson, Ncw Toik, New YoA 

1942 Gz ?. :z H. PBOfe, SI. LooiB, IffioBOiiri 
De, a. B. STorr. Xe^ York, New Toik 
Vnp.viN Tatlcp. >'^~ Yori^ New York 
C.J. Van Borz N-. Bdbykn, Long Isfauid, New Yorit 

: ' ^ : R : : ea. ?. : "•' 1 1 1 : ?-' :- - '- neva. New YoA 

^^j^ ZirzAiZTH C. '^■'^:"' -.e^bog. New Jeraey 

1943 AiEip.T C. But.- MawdiuwRtte 
1943 ViNczNT DzPz7:.> -^ Midiigui 

1943 Ed^>3: Z Fa?.?.:? .-.a, Mawnrfmaetta 

1943 JzN5 JzNszv, E;.:5 :z Z lonsin 

1943 Hzyz.T T Sz:?-^~- H-^Z Pennsyivania 

1944 E. Z7 - „ ™* 
1944 WixF?:: ^ ziii? r - uth, 

1944 R:c^'.?.: 5.: n vr? :^ New York 

1945 J:-z?z H. Hill Z. liiana 
1945 .\lbzbt HrxuEY. M:: : -: ' Z -i^admaetiB 

1945 Jacob K. Shl*~. Az-'^--- ' ' ^^ -M^tpttB 

1946 V Airzz B i zzz zia 






■ ^4^ ^ z-zii "■' 'J r)Z:z; > - -Z -- -"-ff 

1^4- ZiM-^o F. PaL2:i^- ^Z::.Z^z: --\-::z : z ' Z : . Gsnada 

1947 Iz A F. Bi.zz^iiz r ;Z. z-z r' -•:==--&« 

1947 Thzz H Z zzzzz : i.NewYotk 

1947 Jamz- ' H-TzzzT. Zz-'zz- Hz. :Z-- zs .. 

1947 Dz. Zzz^zz Zz.z~- Z'zzz:zz Hzz : z Hz??3cfaHHpttw 

1947 Izazzzza ?zz--y Z-zz--- Zzj 

1&4& Siiii^MA-v EzzzzicK. Lw:...^r^ :;:.,iii^.:j-_£i:i= 

1948 EuoRST F. C :z. Coooniit Game, ¥1arida 
1948 JoH>rL P- zzz Dedham, MiwiaiUiini itii 

1948 Ep.tc Wazzzzz - z FrandBeo, CaBfagnia 

1949 >Z zz: Z-zzzz zi, IfaaBaduBeltB 
1949 Hzy?.z K ^.>zz:z : zaesviDe, Ota o 
1949 Geozz ZZ ?a_vzz Zhestnoi Hill, 

1949 -A. KzNzs-ETH SiMP< : ~ zsfidd, Mm—iliiiw'HB 
19i9 H-'Zr. : iz B . TrxzT , Z - Z z!:?!ii& Michipui 

1950 M :>rzA:-rz F?^z >'^^ J :- N'ewYofk 
1950 Dr, Wiz^ : ? : zzz" z ^ ^r: zzaJpa, Honduras 
1950 Kz>-s-e:th ? .z^ t , I - z i zz Z' - - Y^rk 
1950 GzoEGZ L. S^zz Grzevi. Ne- Y:Zz 

56 



Bequests to the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society 



IT IS hoped by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society that it 
mil not be forgotten by members who find it expedient to make 
their wills. This Society's financial condition is sound and its 
investments are good, but the income from many of its investments 
has declined because of decreased returns from its bond holdings. 
Expenses naturally have increased and more money is needed to 
extend the activities of the Society. 

The following form of bequest is suggested: 



FORM OF BEQUEST 



I give and bequeath to the Massachusetts Horticul- 
tural Society located in Boston, Massachusetts, the sum 

of to be used as the Board of Trustees 

may direct for the promotion of horticulture in its various 
forms and for extending the activities of the Society along 
educational lines. 

Signed 






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